Ways to Constructively Fill Engineering Vacancies

By: Wynnwith

Vacancies in the UK engineering job market arise for a number of reasons. The major reason for new positions in the marketplace is the expansion of a firm, requiring additional personnel. Other vacancies are available due to the reorganisation of an engineering firm, which many open up new positions created from defunct ones. Finally, the advancement of engineering professionals upward within a firm or onto another firm is a typical reason for the existence of job vacancies in engineering.

All of these reasons can be troublesome for hiring managers as they all have issues associated with them. The least troublesome reason, expansion, may still be questionable for some applicants who are curious if the engineering firm can maintain the increasing level of service over the long term. Reorganisation can be a turn off for talented engineering professionals, as it indicates that a firm may reorganise again in the future at will and leave an engineer looking for another job. Finally, advancement opportunities for previous engineers may bode well for some applicants but the question is whether there are enough advancement opportunities to go around. Hiring managers need to develop constructive ways of answering these questions and filling engineering vacancies. The aforementioned reasons for an applicant to become leery of a potential job are obviously worst case scenarios. The job of the hiring manager and recruiters at an engineering firm is to ease these concerns and convince talented professionals to throw their hat in the ring.

The expansion issue can easily be remedied by a talented hiring manager. The managers, speaking directly with a potential applicant, should speak about the raw numbers in regards to increased profits and the updated technology that the company has invested in. As well, hiring managers need to dispel the idea that expansion in the engineering industry is as haphazard as a sceptical graduate may think. Expansion is typically permanent and a hiring manager should speak about the deliberate manner of their firm in coming to their decision.

The other two issues mentioned previously are more difficult to navigate. Human resources professionals and recruiters need to stay focused on the positives and answer the aforementioned questions in a manner that places them in the most extreme of circumstances. Recruiters should speak about reorganisation as a necessary, though rare, part of their firm's effort to offer great service and maintain a strong professional staff. As well, human resources professionals can constructively fill vacancies left by advancement by demonstrating the potential for new engineers in the future.

Careers and Job Hunting
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