Feline Health

By: S.a. Wilson

Despite continued advances in feline healthcare, behavior problems are still the most common reason for cat euthanasia.  While diseases pose a threat to your cat, misunderstanding its behavior can be just as dangerous.  Research shows negative behavior (like destroying furniture and urinating outside the litter box ) is the primary reason that cats are euthanized.  Often these behaviors are associated with curable illnesses.

Patches of hair loss or a greasy or matted appearance can signal underlying diseases.  A decrease in grooming behavior is associated with fear, anxiety, obesity, or illnesses.  An increase in grooming may be a sign of a skin problem.  Your cat can be stressed despite having an "easy" life because the social organization of cats is different from that of people and dogs.  Changes in the family, such as adding a new pet, should be done gradually.  A stressed cat may spend more time awake and scanning its environment, withdraw from society, and exhibit signs of depression like fluctuating appetite.

Anemia is commonly associated with specific diseases in cats like chronic renal failure.  A hormone called erythropoietin (EPO) is produced by the kidneys and stimulates the bone marrow to produce new red blood cells to replace old and worn ones in circulation.  In diseases such as chronic renal failure, EPO levels may be decreased and anemia may develop as a result.  Typical signs associated with anemia are decreased activity and poor appetite.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the most common cause of chronic vomiting and diarrhea in cats, is a disease in which diet may have an important role.  The intestinal wall becomes thickened by inflammatory cells, and the microscopic and gross surface folds of the intestinal lining are flattened, leading to a great loss of surface area.  As the surface area is reduced, the ability of the cat to digest and absorb nutrients is reduced, leading to weight loss in the face of normal or increased appetite.  The stools often become looser and in some cases, more odorous.  As cats are obligate carnivores, the carnivorous diet provides cats with a ready dietary source of certain nutrients not supplied by an omnivorous or vegetarian diet, thus negating the need to synthesize these nutrients.   As most household cats no longer hunt, and without the evolutionary pressure to maintain the relevant metabolic pathways, cats have lost their ability to synthesize the micronutrients which are amply present in the tissues of their traditional prey.

Obesity has also become a serious health concern for cats bringing with it increased risks of diabetes mellitus, joint disease, and other problems.  Cats with hyperthyroidism or diabetes mellitus can lose weight despite good appetites.

Western medicine relies on aggressive prescription drugs and surgery to deal with many problems related to feline health.  Unfortunately, these methods often result in unwanted and even dangerous side effects.

Ayurveda, the science of life, prevention and longevity, is the oldest and most holistic and comprehensive medical system available.  Its fundamentals can be found in Hindu scriptures called the Vedas - the ancient Indian books of wisdom written over 5,000 years ago.  Ayurveda uses the inherent principles of nature to help maintain good health in cats by keeping the feline body, mind, and spirit in perfect equilibrium with nature.

India Herbs has a seasoned group of Ayurvedic doctors specialized in Vajikarana, one of the eight major specialties of Ayurveda.  Vajikarana prescribes the therapeutic use of various herbal and tonic preparations geared towards rejuvenating your cat.

India Herbs' Vajikarana scientists combine a proprietary herbal formula based on centuries old wisdom with advice on diet and exercise to help your cat attain optimal health, appearance, and longevity through safe and natural means.

Results: The precise combination of ingredients in AyurCat along with a mind-body focus precisely addresses your cat's health concerns!

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