Subprime Second Mortgage: Who Needs One

By: Mike Hamel

Subprime lenders are providing first mortgages, second mortgages and home equity loans to those who don't qualify for conventional financing. Many of the more than 19,000 mortgage lenders in the U.S. offer some form of subprime mortgages.

Subprime borrowers are people with a FICO score of 620 or lower. In fact, the “sweet spot" for the subprime industry consists of borrowers with credit scores between 620 and 640. Bad credit means you will pay more when you borrow money. However, a subprime second mortgage could still save you thousands of dollars over other forms of borrowing.

Prior to the widespread availability of subprime loans, many deserving people with poor or insufficient credit histories could not get a mortgage.

Now these folks are able to become proud homeowners as part of the American Dream.

A subprime second mortgage makes sense when you don’t want to refinance your first mortgage but want to access your home equity for legitimate reasons such as home improvements, debt consolidation, medical bills or college tuition. As an added bonus, the interest paid on a second mortgage is usually tax deductible.

Borrower Beware

Recent research reveals that subprime mortgages are three times more likely to happen in minority neighborhoods. Even affluent minorities are more likely than whites to take out subprime mortgages. The AARP notes that older female borrowers held 45% of subprime mortgages and only 28% of prime mortgages.

Some dishonest lenders will try and exploit the financial troubles of borrowers by offering easy-but-expensive credit that could lead to them eventually losing their homes. Or, these disreputable people resort to exorbitant fees, prepayment penalties or balloon payments to snare the unwary.

Learn more about how to avoid fraud, and get a free loan quote at . Even if you have bad credit, you may still qualify for a good second mortgage.

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