Extended Warranties Suck In Your Money And Run

By: Karlw.heinzel
An extended warranty can apply to an automobile or any other large purchase. But the truth is, they are rarely worth it. Truth be told, what they call an extended warranty is not really a warranty at all. It actually should be called a service contract. These agreements are usually tacked onto your automobile purchase or other large purchase at the time of sale. Car dealers attempt to get an extra one to 3000 dollars out of you by having you sign the service contracts and pay money up front for any repairs not covered by the product warranty.

Car Dealers try to scare you into purchasing a service contract for your peace of mind after your factory warranty expires. This is because service contract sales are a huge profit maker for a car dealer. Typically, 50% or more of the selling price goes to the dealer as the seller. However, rarely do these "Extended Warranties" provide you with the protection that you are led to believe they have and would expect.

Usually these contracts don't cover the following:

No maintenance records. you need to be able to produce records proving that you have maintained their vehicle according to the manufacturer's maintenance schedule. If you don't have proof, you don't get coverage.

Consider wear and tear parts. Things like brake pads, shoes, hoses, even shock absorbers are considered items that normally wear out and are usually not covered. Anything they can be considered normal wear and tear is generally not part of the contract.

Breakage of a noncovered part. Damage caused by non-covered parts are not included in your contract coverage even if they do cover items that are under contract. For example hoses are not covered by the contract, so if a hose breaks and causes major engine damage it won't be covered even if major engine failure IS covered.

"Exploratory surgery" . In most cases, there is a fair model labor involved in discovering what the problem is and this will only be covered if the problem turns out to be a covered part. Otherwise you'll end up stuck with the bill. In the garage may not even start on the work until you paid for the labor front.

Repair option restrictions. You may have a very difficult time getting your vehicle repaired due to restrictions in the contract as to where you can get the work done. Sometimes the contracts are very specific about who can do the work. On the other hand, some service contracts have gained a reputation of not paying so the service center won't even honor the contract itself. In that case, they'll ask you for the money upfront and leave you to try and get reimbursed from the contract company.

With all of the above hurdles, it is hard to imagine receiving any peace of mind if you actually need to use your service contract. Additionally, with the quality of today's vehicles the odds of needing a major repair during the first six years of your car's life are slim. The bottom line is to save your money. In most situations you will be farther ahead monetarily and have greater peace of mind by saving your money for a rainy day.
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