Help! My Baby Wont Stop Crying

By: Tracey Wilson

Congratulations on your new arrival! After all the waiting and participation, your baby is finally here. But wait, things aren’t as you dreamed. Your new bundle of joy isn’t so joyful. In fact, she is the complete opposite – crying and fussing constantly.

The first thing you must know, is this does not mean you’re a bad parent. Crying is a way for babies to try and communicate. It’s the only form of communication they have. If you haven’t already, soon you will learn all of your baby’s different cries, to tell you if she’s hungry, tired, needs changing, or simply wants to be held and cuddled.

If your baby has been crying over a long period of time, then there is a possibility that your baby may be colicky. Nearly ? of all newborns are colicky within the first two months of life. Doctors really don’t know what causes it; as they do not always and in fact, most of the time, do not exhibit the signs of actually being in physical pain. Of course, you should always rule out other possible reasons for crying, with the baby’s pediatrician.

Crying usually peaks at six weeks and lasts until about three months.

Don’t worry about spoiling a newborn baby. Most of the experts will tell you it is impossible to do so. When you hold and talk to your crying baby, you are building up their trust in you, and giving them the reassurance and love they need.

Your baby may show some signs of a hurting tummy, by pulling their legs up toward their body, or lying in a curled position. You can try and help control the amount of gas they accumulate by making sure they’re in an upright position while feeding, burping them often, and not laying them down for at least thirty to forty-five minutes after they eat.

Pacifiers are good for a crying baby as well. The sucking motion actually helps soothe them deep within the nervous system.

Some suggestions to help relieve your baby of gas pains, hence relieving your nerves as well; you can try these actions below:

? A warm bath followed by a massage -- especially a light pressure rub on the tummy.

? Holding them in the football hold, which is laying your baby tummy down on your arm, resting their chin in your hand, with their legs on each side of your arm – pat her back lightly.

? Play classical music, shushing sounds, white noise (ceiling fan, vacuum, etc…), or natural sounds. This is especially beneficial in the first three months of life.

? Make sure she doesn’t get air in her bottle. You can help eliminate air, by shaking the bottle, bending and squeezing it down, to release trapped air.

? Laying the baby down on her tummy over your knees and lightly bouncing her.

Sleep is very important for both emotional and physical health. When trying to get a crying baby to sleep, make sure it’s dark and quiet, (if there is any background noise, it should only be the sounds listed previously). Swaddle them – this is wrapping them snug and secure in a blanket, giving them the feel of the womb. Babies also like the feel of skin-on-skin contact. Keep your baby on a regular schedule, as much as you are able.

Make sure you rest when baby rests. After allFree Articles, calm parents equal a calm baby.

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