On Mothers Day We Need to Take the Time to Honor

By: Anne Harvester

On Mother’s Day, we take time to honor she who in many cultures for ages uncounted was known as the “Life-Giver.” The earliest clay figures made by man were depictions of the ideal mother. In prehistoric and early historical times – particularly in “tribal,” hunting-gathering societies in northern lands – anthropologists speculate that early humans, lacking knowledge of biology and other sciences, had not understood the connection between the sex act and pregnancy and childbirth. Therefore, a woman’s “getting power” – the ability to bring forth life – was seen as a very powerful sort of magic. Although we have no way of knowing what types of celebrations these early humans had, it is very likely that a woman would receive a very unique and important Mother’s Day gift on certain days.
Today, the science behind conception and childbirth is well understood, but that doesn’t make it any less miraculous. This understanding – and the tradition of presenting Mother’s Day gifts – is reflected in the fact that Mother’s Day, in some form, is celebrated all over the world in virtually every culture.

Even more significantly, these observances have evolved independently, having almost nothing to do with the Mother’s Day celebrated in the U.S.
In Great Britain, for example, the holiday is known as Mothering Sunday. Unlike the American holiday, Mothering Sunday is generally observed in March, three weeks before Easter. This is also true in Ireland and Nigeria. In France, Sweden, Haiti and the Domincan Republic, Mother’s Day is usually observed on the first Sunday in May, unless that coincides with the religious holiday of Pentecost; in this case, it postponed until June.
In Korea and Albania, the day is celebrated on 8 May every year, but is actually called “Parent’s Day” and is an observance that honors fathers and well as mothers. No matter which country it is, Mother’s Day seems to be associated with spring, so it should come as no surprise that in South America, Mother’s Day is observed in October, where it is known as Dia de la Madre.
In some countries, Mother’s Day is connected with important women in high places. In Thailand, for example, Mother’s Day is currently observed on August 12th, which is the birthday of their beloved Queen, H.M. Sirikit Kitiyara. In many parts of the Muslim world including Iran, the observance also occurs during the boreal summer during the month of Jumada. ‘Al-thani, or “Women’s Day,” is the traditional date of the birth of Fatima Zahra, who was the daughter of the prophet Muhammad. The Sufi sect of Islam associates her with Mary, mother of Jesus, who is held in high esteem by many Muslims.
As humans, all of us have significant things in common that outweigh issues of culture, language and religious beliefs - not the least of which is that we are have a mother – and many will be honouring their mothers with Mother’s Day gift baskets, which can be as unique as the mother who receives it.

Motherhood
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