High Tech Jobs are Growing Fast

By: rickstooker
Five high tech jobs are on the Bureau of Labor Statistics' latest list of the 30 fastest-growing jobs in the U.S. from 2004 to 2014. Two of these jobs are also on the Bureau of Labor Statistics' latest list of the 30 jobs that will grow the most in total numbers.

The two jobs that are on both the fastest growing and biggest growing lists are:

Network systems and data communication analyst -- $61,250 (average salary according to the BLS)

This is basically a networking engineer or network administrator, who keeps networks up and running properly. They must deal with network-related problems, both technical and human (forgotten passwords, for example), that inevitably come up.

Computer systems software engineer -- $81,140 (average salary according to the BLS)

This job entails designing and running the software needed to keep a company's computers and networks up and operational.

The three jobs which are also fast-growing, but where demand in total numbers won't be as high as the above two jobs, are:

Computer applications software engineer -- $76,310 (average salary according to the BLS)

This could be called computer software programming, but at a higher level of design and complexity. Routine coding can and will be outsourced to India and other low-wage countries. However, making sure that a given program both meets the needs of the user, from the get-go, and in its final version, demands personal contact and hands on involvement with the end user as well as the code.

Computer systems analyst -- $67,520

This often varies by employer but will involve working with networks.

Database administrator -- $61,950

This job is extremely important, since companies depend on their ability to store information. On customers, on products, on employees, and so on.

A good database administrator who could help the Marketing Department figure out the right questions to ask of their customer database and figure out how to mine for the answers, could help their employer make a lot more money.

It's significant that six years after the dot com crash, the world has not abandoned computers. The Internet is no longer seen as a source of instant stock market riches and techies are no longer kings . . .

But good techies in the right fields are still in demand. Dotcoms rose and died between Super Bowl commercials, but now every business is online and the average American and many people around the world accept the Internet as an integral part of their daily lives.

Routine IT work is being outsourced to India, but companies still need savvy techies who can work closely with customers to give them what they want.

Student enrollment in Computer Science departments is down. This will raise demand for those who do graduate with Computer Science degrees -- and for many otherwise qualified applicants.

Many techies working for U.S. companies are foreign-born, but that may change in the years to come. Both India and China have fast expanding economies. They may need to keep their highly educated techies working inside their own borders, and may be willing be pay competitive wages to do so. China certainly has the hard dollars to do so. They may even repatriate some of their citizens who are now gaining valuable experience in the U.S. and other developed countries.

Someday soon we may discover that there's a shortage of techies in the U.S.
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