Peru is a Magical Spot

By: Douglas Scott

Peru is divided into three regions. Although this simple division is a fair portrait of Perus geography, the reality is much richer and far more complex.

In Peru, nature appears to have taken on particular characteristics which have turned its mountains, plains, jungles and valleys in to unique habitats. An extraordinary variety of eco systems shelters a wide diversity of animals and plants.

The Coast which features deserts, beautiful beaches and fertile valleys.

The Peruvian coastline is formed by a long snaking desert hemmed in between the sea and the mountains. The Andes to the east and the cold Humboldt Sea current that runs along the coast are what make this area so arid. From the Sechura desert to the Nazca plains and the Atacama Desert, the dry coastal terrain is occasionally split by valleys covered by a thick layer of cloud and drizzle in the winter.

Heir to ancient cultures and a rich colonial tradition, Peru is a magical spot which involves one of the richest biodiversities of Earth, and is a melting pot of different cultures that together are forging the promise of a better future.

Ten thousand years of history are lived through 180 museums and historical places. While Peru inevitably evokes images of Machu Picchu and the Inca empire, the country is also riddled with archaeological sites which are a legacy of even more ancient times, when great civilizations bequeathed a legacy of their art, customs and rituals, their wisdom and skills.

Peru is a country that sings and dances in joy and sadness with colour and a great deal of paraphernalia. Peruvians celebrate some 3,000 festivals all over the country.

Over 40,000 restaurants across the country reflect the diversity of a nation that has mixed its native traditions with the cuisines of Europe, Arabia, China, Africa and Japan. The result unique flavours that make Peruvian cuisine one of the best and most varied in the world.

Peru is a nation of mixed ethnic origins. Throughout its history, Peru has been the meeting ground for different nations and cultures. The indigenous population was joined 500 years ago by the Spaniards.

As a result of this encounter, and later enriched by the migration of African blacks, Asians and Europeans, Peruvian man emerged as the representative of a nation whose rich ethnic mix is one of its leading characteristics.

As part of its rich cultural tradition, Peru features many different languages. Although Spanish is commonly spoken across the country, Quechua is a major legacy of the Inca Empire, and is still spoken with regional dialects in many parts of Peru.

In addition, other languages are spoken such as Aymara and a startling variety of dialects in the Amazon jungle, which are divided up into 15 linguistic families and 43 different languages.

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