Driving in France

By: Doug

Driving in France

The French road network includes over 5000 miles of motorways, many of which are peage (toll roads) which link the main provincial towns and cities. French roads are generally well maintained and apart from the main cities congestion is rare.

Despite the French love for fine wine the drink drive regulations are strict with the limit set at 50mg per 100ml of blood.

The minimum driving age is 18, seat belts are compulsory in front and back seats.

Always drive on the right. Don't obstruct fast lanes. On some motorways and open roads you can overtake slow moving traffic on the left, just keep an eye out for the signs.

Unless indicated otherwise, speed limits are 50km/h in towns, 80km/h on the Paris periphique, 90km/h on main roads, 110 km/h on dual-carriage ways and 130 km/h on motorways

Driving licence, insurance certificate and vehicle registration documents must be shown at any roadside controls.
In cities and towns the right of way is sometimes given to vehicles coming in from the right, look out for the large flashing 'X' which indicates that you do not have priority.

There are many roundabouts close to towns and you must slow down and give way to the vehicles already on the roundabout.

Speed limits are enforced and there are plenty of radar controls. Radar detectors are illegal and you will be prosecuted for possession.

By law you must carry a warning triangle.

One law you must be aware of is priorite Ã? droite. This gives the right of way to motorists turning onto the road you are on, and in the direction you are travelling, from the right. The exceptions are if the junction is marked by a stop sign, traffic light or solid white line, as well as roundabouts, where cars to your left have the right-of-way. Pay particular attention in rural areas, where traffic on minor road may have right-of-way when joining a main road.

Europe Destinations
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 

» More on Europe Destinations
 



Share this article :
Click to see more related articles