Job Hunting Tip: What Employers Are Looking For In You

By: pmegan
One of the most dramatic changes in the 21st Century job market is in the way employers consider you when they first lay eyes on you.

For example, if you think that it's your resume that will get you a job, you're in for a long, LONG job search!

Or if you're intent on proving yourself based on your work history . . . what you used to do for someone else . . . get ready for disappointment and rejection.

And if your confidence is based on your ability to passively answer all the questions an interviewer throws at you, you already lost.

Today's employers are looking for people with energy. And they pick up on your energy before they even formally meet you. Do you exhibit the energy employers are looking for?

Energetic people exude vigor, enthusiasm and drive. They want and need to be active. Employers can sense this quality in a person almost as soon as they enter the room. They have a spring in their step and a drive that puts a sparkle in their eyes.

All this occurs even before you open your mouth. We know from experience that an employer or interviewer will make a go/no-go decision about you in a matter of seconds all based on the sense of energy you communicate when they first lay eyes on you.

So, if you are not this type of person, it would be wise to practice how to look and act energetically so that you can make a good first impression. It really makes a big difference because job opportunities are literally won or lost depending on how you enter a room.

Being aware of employers' expectations is critical to your job search success. The old-fashioned job hunting techniques focused all the attention on YOU . . . your work history, your past accomplishments, your academic and other credentials, your qualifications, your objectives.

But all that's changed. Today employers expect you to know what THEIR needs are and how you can fill them going forward. Displaying energy is the first step.
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