Canary Islands Naturist holiday in Charco de Palo

By: Wendy Palmer
Charco de Palo is a remote naturist (clothes optional) vacation resort on the north-east coast of Lanzarote, in the Canary Islands. The whole island of Lanzarote is a magical and other-world sort of place and Charco de Palo is no exception to this. Its remoteness and beautiful setting right on the volcanic coast, creates a mystical atmosphere of tranquillity that has inspired many naturists to build permanent homes there. The whole village consists of approximately one hundred holiday dwellings and twenty permanent residences. All are served by four restaurants, a small supermarket, a hairdresser and a boutique. The nearest village with more shops and restaurants is approximately three miles away.Many apartments, including the one we stayed in are right on the beach and offer a high standard of accommodation. The whole area is naturist so a typical day commences by waking up in the morning and stepping outside to feel the sea air and the suns rays on your naked body before sitting down to breakfast on the patio overlooking the sea. After washing up the breakfast things, the task of arranging the sun beds is carefully undertaken before settling down upon them to read a book. Perhaps a little later it is time to consider a dip in one of the huge sea pools, created by lava cooling as it crashed into the sea nearly two centuries ago and was more recently sculptured by people into something resembling Roman amphitheatres. Alternatively, we might take a walk along one of the many coastal paths. Either way, there is no need to dress as the naturist area extends for miles around the resort and everywhere in it except inside the shops and restaurants. Lunch would usually follow in the same way as breakfast; au naturale and el fresco.

Since our apartment faced east, the sun would go behind it in the afternoons. The plus side of this was that it provided a motive for getting up after lunch and going somewhere else. The somewhere else wasn’t too far way however. Usually it meant the beach or finding a spot in the largest of the sea pool sun traps. This provided some fantastic entertainment when the tide was high and the wind was blowing. The full force of Atlantic waves breaking over the black volcanic rocks and creating a plume of spray thirty feet in the air above the pool was as spectacular as a firework show to watch. Miniature rainbows would form briefly as the suns rays were caught in the mist. Jets of water shot through small holes in the rocks. Cascades rushed over rocks creating tumultuous waterfalls that then subsided into delightful mountain streamlets, singing out their enchanting tunes before being lost in the sound of the next crashing wave.Our afternoon might finish with another walk, sometimes into the surrounding hills or through the maze of tracks that led to the next village. When we returned it was time for a game of Scrabble before getting ready for our evening fun. The most difficult decision of the day was then made; which restaurant to eat at. The remainder of the evening was then a matter of enjoining some very good food, a few too many drinks and the company of several like-minded people.To find exactly where Charco de Palo is located, look on a map of Lanzarote for Arrecife. This is the island capital and also where the international airport is.? About five miles north of Arrecife, looking along the coast you will see the popular tourist resort of Costa Teguise. Here, the coastal road ends and the coastline turns at Punta de Tierra Negra to take a more northerly direction. Charco de Palo is approximately another five miles north of this point.Travelling by hire car or taxi from the airport will take about twenty minutes and instead of heading up the coast you would follow the main LZ1 highway inland to Tahiche then turn right, following the main road to Mala. In Mala, take the right turn back to the coast which meanders down to Charco de Palo.The best travel tips for considering a vacation in Charco de Palo are:1.The resort is intended for naturists so if you do not dare to bare its better not to dare to go there!2.Go to Charco de Palo if you want peace and tranquillity and like the sound of the simple, laid back way we spent our holiday there. If you are a someone who wants more do to, the naturist resort of Magnolias in Maspalomas, Gran Canaria would be a better Canary Island choice.3.Although the Canary Islands experience warm, spring-like weather the whole year around, Charco de Palo is on the north-east coast of Lanzarote. We went in March and at times, especially in the evenings, the wind was too chilly for our liking. February and March tend to be the coolest months of the year so if you want a Canary Island naturist holiday that’s likely to be a little warmerFree Reprint Articles, go to Charco de Palo at another time or go to Magnolias where its generally always a few degrees warmer.

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