The Cultural Capital of Jutland

By: Douglas Scott

The second-largest city and the cultural capital of Jutland is Arhus in Denmark. The city lies roughly in the geographical centre of Denmark in the relatively sparsely populated peninsula of Jutland with large natural areas and reserves nearby.

The harbour is the largest in Denmark and one of the largest industrial harbours in northern Europe.

The city is known far and wide beyond Denmark for its lively music scene. It has a large Concert Hall and hosts major cultural events all year round, including the famous Aarhus Festival.

Aarhus Denmark also stakes its reputation as one of the best places in the country to grab a drink. Stroll alongside the Aarhus Creek and you will all kinds of cafes and bars that have cropped up in recent years as the citys teeming nightlife is always a constant tourist draw. Deep in the streets near the old town, the drinking goes steady and joyfully into the small hours of the night.

Aarhus University buildings and townscapes was designed by the Danish architect C.F. Moller, the University of Aarhus is recognised internationally for its stylish yet sympathetic architecture and how it blends in with the contours of the surrounding parkland. The University is attended by approx. 20,000 students.

The Old Town in Aarhus, Denmark is an open-air village museum consisting of 75 historical buildings collected from 20 townships in all parts of the country. In 1914 the museum opened for the first time as the worlds first open-air museum of its kind and till this day it remains one of just a few top rated Danish museums outside Copenhagen having some 3.5 million visitors per year.

The Danish Clock Museum show cases is a fully equipped watch makers shop with workshops for tower watch maker and ordinary watch makers. The museum has a large collection of Danish and foreign clocks and watches and shows the development from sun dials and hour glasses to mechanical clocks. The earliest clocks from the 1500s had only one hand to show the hour of the day but later and more sophisticated clocks showed time in fractions of a second and the position of planets.

The seventeenth-century Clausholm is a splendid baroque palace, one of the earliest in Denmark. It was commissioned by Frederick IV's chancellor, whose adolescent daughter, Anna Sophie, eloped with the king. When Frederick died, his son by his first marriage banished the queen to Clausholm, where she lived with her court until her death in 1743.

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