A Couple Common Misconceptions About Hybrids

By: Jonbuttress
Capitalism is amazing because the people have the ability to control its direction. By people, of course, I mean consumers. As modern society has become environmentally conscious and gas price savvy, the hybrid vehicle has appeared.

While hybrids have certainly become a popular alternative to big gas guzzlers, there are some definite assumptions that simply are not true. The assumptions are both positive and negative, so let's take a closer look at two of the big ones.

Everyone hates taxes, but not when it comes to hybrids. The common myth is you can get a huge tax benefit if you buy a hybrid. As with anything involving taxes, you should know this is sometimes true and sometimes not.

When taxes are invovled, it should be no surprise there are pitfalls with claiming a tax credit for buying one. The first requirement is you must buy a new vehicle, not a used one. The second requirement is the IRS must have approved the vehicle.

Many people want to know the amount of the hybrid tax credit, but it is an impossible question to answer. The IRS sets a different amount for each and every car. It then has the option of reducing this amount each quarter of the year.

The hybrid tax credit was designed to get people interested in hybrids. Given this fact, it should be no surprise the credit is phased out after a certain number of vehiles are sold. The beloved Prius, in fact, is about to lose its credit.

The Japanese manufacturers have always been way ahead in the game. Toyota is about to lose its tax credit, and Honda can see the end of its in a few years time. This is just the way the law was written, not a territorial matter.

A second area of misunderstanding with the hybrid vehicle has to do with the batteries. Obviously, the car requires special batteries. There is a myth that they have to be replaced every 40,000 miles. This is alleged to be a big problem because they are expensive.

The great hybrid conspiracy is truly funny once you look at a key fact. Each new hybrid comes with a battery warranty between 80,000 and 100,000 miles. This would suggest that they last a long time, no?

Should you make your next vehicle a hybrid? If you want to cut your driving costs and help the environment, then the answer is definitely yes. Just make sure to buy it new and check with the IRS on your tax credit amount.
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