Unsurpassed Info on Relocation Process to an Island

By: Albert Scheper

Moving to the Caribbean may sound like living in a paradisiacal condition isn't it? Will you be relocating permanently or temporarily? For some people, realizing the challenges and potential hindrances in living successfully in the islands weren't considered ahead of time. Unfortunately, many fall into the trap of moving to islands permanently and they ended up not being able to return to the city after they sold all their properties for their major moves. This isn't something you want to experience hence, before deciding on moving to the Tropics, explore your options carefully.

Probe yourself endlessly on how you plan to move out to the islands. One factor that might influence your decision about relocating to an island could be how strictly immigration requirements are implemented and enforced on that Caribbean island. Ask about residency requirements and any laws governing citizenship from a lawyer. Inquire if you have to meet regulations governing number of dependents allowed too.

Think about your financial situation. Can you afford to live for the rest of your life on what you've managed to save and invest? Or will you still need to work on a daily or seasonal basis? You need to consider this carefully for your survival in a far flung place like the islands. Understand that tourism may be the best opportunity in the Caribbean so ask yourself if you have what it takes to be an aggressive agent to earn a living. Do you need to get work permits for you to secure a work or do you need to change your citizenship for you to work in the Caribbean?

Do your research about cost of living-- the affordability of transportation and housing on your income level, and whether you can qualify for clear title for businesses and your property. If you have dependents, that makes moving to the tropics a bit more difficult. For one, you have to inquire about the educational system of the country or island. For instance, is there a relaxed or secured education system that's based on the international education standards? Realize that this is important for your children for them to be admitted in future employment.

Related to this matter, check the schools' locations if these are nearer to your potential place to stay or how far it would take you and your children to travel for their school days? Is there a transport system for your children if you don't have a private car to use in the islands? Can you afford the type of healthcare offered in the area and is the level of health care to the level that you were expecting? What if health care is sub-standard on that island, would you still be satisfied to live there? And what if you and your children have pets? Does the government have some kind of quarantine against bringing in pets from another country?

As you can see, moving to the Caribbean means not just examining the short-term leisurely benefits but also predicting what your long-term survival prospects in that place. Don't let your thoughts stop at being able to wake up to a beautiful sunrise and eating fruits for breakfast. Instead, let your thoughts jump ahead to when your savings are dwindling and you haven't saved a cent for retirement. Think fast. How would you survive if a hurricane hits the island you have relocated to? Realizing that this is most possible especially during winter for various Caribbean islands, you'll be guided accordingly on your choice to move to the Caribbean and your choice of location. And when your kids have graduated from high school and need to start applying to different colleges, do you think they will be able to make the grade and then survive a move away from your island paradise to the more hectic workaday world of urban centers? Things you need to think about carefully, actually.

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