The Wooden City of Europe

By: Douglas Scott

Trondheim was founded by the Viking king Olaf I Tryggvason in the 10th century. It is situated where the river Nidelva meets a large fjord, Trondheimsfjorden. There is no darkness from May 20 to July 20 but it has an area of great beauty with rich natural habitats.

During World War Two under the Nazi occupation Trondheim became the base of German naval forces in northern Norway, with U-boats lurking deep in its fjord.

Today the town is spoken of as one of the typical wooden cities of Europe, and the city centre has many special wooden buildings, some built as far back as the 1700s.

Trondheim is the third larges city in Norway. The town is just as expensive as the rest of its Nordic counterparts. It is mainly a student city crowded up with youth that covers all Norwegian origins as well as world wide. Every sixth person in Trondheim is a student which earns it the title of Norway's best student town.

Bakklandet, is a area where the old wooden houses contain everything from cafes and art galleries to antique shops and local designers selling their collections. Walk across the pedestrian bridge Verftsbrua, and you enter the Solsiden area, Trondheims most modern part of town. Here, you find a large shopping mall, several cafs and restaurants.

Right in the centre of the city is Nordre Gate, a popular pedestrian precinct and centre for night life. In is the area you can find quiet cafes and restaurants as well as lively discos and salsa bars.

The city has a rich cultural life with an international flavour. The city is host for a wide range of festivals Kosmorama International Film Festival, Trondheim Jazz Festival, Trondheim Chamber Music Festival and Nidaros Blues Festival.

The Rose of Trondheim is a five-petal rose of the 18th century has mainly been used as a symbol of the city. During this period the Rose of Trondheim was frequently used by the Major and the Aldermen.

The Archbishop's Palace Museum was build in 1983 two large storage buildings which stood in the precinct burned to the ground. After five years of archaeological excavations a new museum building was constructed on the site of the fire. The Archbishop's Palace Museum received the Norwegian Museum of the Year Award in 1998.

The Nidelva river is one of Norway's best trout and salmon rivers, famous far beyond the country's borders because of its unusually large salmon.

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