discount Migration Masai Mara Safari

By: Robert Muhoho

Masai Mara Kenya migration highlights

The Masai Mara Kenya migration safari is the biggest animal migration tour anywhere in the world. And that is without a doubt. Masai Mara game reserve is the most visited popular and favorite Kenya migration park. Located in the middle of Masai warrior land in Kenya, the Masai Mara packs millions of wildlife in an area not so vast. Sighting of all the big five is guaranteed with a little luck needed to see the rhino and the leopard.

The Masai Mara, which was recently awarded the 7th new wonder of the world status, has such a high density of animals you will hardly drive 100 yards without seeing an African animal. This famous Africa wildlife park in Kenya is also home to the most African lion prides in Africa. The Masai Mara Park has very beautiful undulating plains with few trees and lots of savannah grass. This enables you to have an uninterrupted view of wildlife on the plains and it is so easy to witness an African lion kill in the Masai Mara.

However, the most awe inspiring, numbing, exhilarating and mind-boggling phenomenon in the Maasai Mara is the annual wildebeest migration. The migration that takes place in the months of august through October is a sight to behold. So large are the numbers of wildebeest in this annual grand match that satellites in space pick it up as a fluid moving elongated black mass-visible on a screen in real time basis.

The wildebeest Masai Mara Kenya migration in the Mara is such a phenomenon it involves over 2.5 million of wildebeest, a quarter of a million zebras and an odd number of antelopes. The wildebeest is believed to be the initiator of this genesis across Masai Mara plains simply by their numbers. The gnu/wildebeest cross through plains and rivers from the Serengeti in Tanzania to the Masai Mara plains in Kenya in a seasonal match that follows the rain patterns and the offshoot of young supple grass pastures. The zebras and the rest of the gang either just follow for curiosity or from the confusion the Masai Mara migration creates.

For as long as 1000 years, the wildebeest migration has continued to take place year in year out and in definite months like clock work in the Masai Mara. Not even the pathetic human efforts to frustrate them will deter their resolve to reach the land of plenty in Kenya. Burnt grass doesn't smell like rain-they figure. The migration of wildebeests in the Masai Mara follows an anti clockwise north -south route inside the Masai Mara crossing dangerous rivers and feeding the resident lions to bloat.

The Masai Mara Kenya migration involves such large numbers of plains game (read food), that lions have no alternative than to follow behind eating the weak and weary. Such an enmass exodus of food in the Masai Mara threatens them with starvation if left behind, I guess, and they are forced to follow too. Why ever we refer to it as a wildebeest migration still beats me. And still the wildebeests trudge on. Some times at a full throttle maddening rush, sometimes a gallop, sometimes at a walk or at times just lazing in the grass without moving a muscle-depends on their mood.

The most breathtaking stage of the Masai Mara wildebeest migration is the river crossings of the Mara river. A river so infested with crocodiles and raging currents creates such impedance to the wildebeest migration that they can take hours or days before they make the plunge. The wildebeests amass at the opposite Masai Mara river bank in their thousands-sorry millions hesitant to take the dive. They know all too well what awaits them in the river-and snappy jaw has never really been their acquaintance.

You will be packed in your van or 4x4 safari vehicle at a vantage point on the banks of the Mara River offering good views but farther enough not to interfere with the sensitive animals match. They gradually amass at the Mara Rivercrossing to such numbers you start wondering if they are ever going to cross today. Suspense starts to build in tenfold by the minute; still none of the wildebeest is ready to burge. They shove, bleat and jostle for the rapidly decreasing spaces between their body masses.

All the while you can see the anxious crocs in the river-possibly cracking their fingers in readiness. But it doesn't happen then. You continue to wait a further 2 hours. Now the rear flanks of wildebeests are really pushing hard and the frontlines are on full breaks, front feet dug in mode, pushing backwards with their might out of fear of being the first to touch water. The bleating turns to a crescendo and the jostling raises blinding dust as the front line wildebeest hold their ground and refuse to make way into the river.

Gnuuu...gnuu...gnuu they bleat in a deafening confused and frightful melee. The uncoordinated bleating of a thousand some wildebeest choking from the dust and compacting pressure of their bodies sound so sickening that you wish they could just jump and get it over with. However your feet are also so hard pressed against the car floor that your toe knuckles ache. Your body has involuntarily sympathized with the wildebeest. Put in their place you know too well that not even the push of a 30 ton truck will make you jump into that river-not with 50 odd snappy-jaw crocs waiting in the dirt brown water. You slowly release the pressure on your feet before a camera trigger-happy tourist gets the better of you.

And then, without a warning it happens. The front wall breaks and the wildebeests tumble into the Mara river in their hundreds. Soon it becomes a thundering splash of water over the slick and rotund bodies of the wildebeest. Other leap so high out of fear only to crash on the backs of the ones already in the river. Backs break, necks get twisted and the stampede continues for a fearful 1 full hour. The force of the stampede even makes the anxious crocodiles scatter for fear of drowning under the sharp hooves and the million tonnes of raw wildebeest body mass. Many wildebeest drown, get trampled or simply snatched by the crocodiles in the river.

From the confusion, some wildebeest will take a wrong turn in the water and miss the narrow exit on the oncoming river bank. Frightfully they fight to mount the almost 90 degrees vertical banks, slippery with their water logged feet they tumble back in the water. Again they rise from the water with little leverage to try the same spot, again and again. So many times that they will finally succumb to fatigue and drown. How horrible. Even the crocodiles don't have to do much but wait for the wildebeest to clear and they gather the drowned tuck them, away in river crevices for a month long feast.

Finally, the last of the wildebeest makes a safe exit from the Masai Mara River. Though a few hundred die at the Mara river crossing, a hundred thousand more will be bone in the next 3 months. It is said that at the wildebeest breeding grounds of Serengeti, over 300,000 calves are given birth to and are ready to move in one single month. A Masai Mara wildebeest calf is born, walks in 10 minutes flat, runs in half an hour and ready to migrate in under an hour. So loosing a few hundred in the Masai Mara migration really doesn't count-its called natural attrition or collateral damage-well within our means, they figure.

Year in year out the wildebeest of the Masai Mara Kenya will migrate without a pause. This is simply the greatest moment of your Kenya migration safari in the Masai Mara game reserve. You may witness some disturbing wildlife feeding scenes and the blood chilling river crossings but always bear in mind that you are watching nature unfolding. All of these events have to take place for there to be harmony in the natural world. The lions have to feed, the crocodiles too (that beats me), and the wildebeest numbers have to be put in check in one way or the other. You can imagine what the 300,000 calves a month without the migration can do to the Masai Mara ecosystem. So take it in stride.

Besides the wildebeest migration, the Masai Mara safari is where you will come up close and personal with the animals of Africa. At times a pride of lions will put you under voluntary siege when they lie under your safari game viewing vehicle for hours for that welcome shade, a cheetah mother climbs on your car's bonnet/hood to check out her next meal over the plains, an elephant grazes a foot next to your car and you can see his brown dot of an eye, a hundred buffalo eyeballs stare at you 20 yards away in a menacing fixed stare(eyeball to eyeball), a giraffe stare hover over your land rover or a cheetah speeds for a kill next to your car. That's all in the Masai Mara wildlife safari. Where all your dreams of an African wildlife safari is fulfilled in a single stop.

Masai Mara Kenya Migration Lodges

There are many quality wildlife park safari lodges in the Masai Mara that host guests. You will be spoilt for choice on the type of accommodation in the Masai Mara safari. Some of the Masai Mara safari lodges include:
Keekorok Masai Mara family Kenya migration safari lodge
Governor's camp-exclusive honeymoon and getaway migration safari camp
Mara simba Masai Mara Kenya migration tour lodge
Sarova Mara game camp and migration tour lodge
Mara sopa lodge-wildebeest migration in Masai Mara lodge
Base camp
Riverside camp for budget Masai Mara migration accommodation
Sekenani camp -for luxury migration Masai Mara Kenya safari
Serena Mara lodge-for Masai Mara wildlife safari in Kenya place to stay
African safari club for all inclusive Masai Mara safaris in Kenya
Fig tree camp-for Kenya migration in Africa safari place to sleep
Cottas camp-for top end luxury Masai Mara migration safari
Rekero camp-top end luxury Masai Mara accommodation
Mara intrepid camp-top end luxury eco tourism camp
Olonana-camp -best Masai Mara ecolodge for luxury Masai Mara migration safari
Mpata safari club-high-end Japanese Masai Mara safari lodge
Siana springs camp-mid range affordable Masai Mara migration camp accommodation
Mara river camp-luxury Masai Mara Kenya safari camp
Oseur Tented camp-mid range family Masai Mara vacation camp

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