Beautiful Coastal Scenery Thats Viveiro in Galicia

By: Stephen Stewart

With regards to the entire Spanish tourist industry Northern Spain and Galicia especially have been very much a hidden treasure and hidden within lies a further particular treasure called Viveiro.

Of all of the autonomous regions of Spain it is understandable given its location that Galicia is considered the most remote and therein lies the charm of Viveiro hidden away longing to be discovered.

The traditional concept of Galicia was always that it was supposedly a poor agricultural region and as such the economy would not be the easiest to modernize yet one of the fasted growing sub sectors within the Galician Economy is tourism and it is this very real relationship with its historical past that give the region its particular appeal.

The cultural and language origins of Galicia are very much rooted within the Celtic family of communities found elsewhere in North West Europe and has led to Galicia always having a sense of looking outwards from their regional base as opposed to looking inwards towards the rest of Spain.

Because of its location and partisan traditions Galicia was always fairly inward looking having managed to survive throughout the centuries without ever really been conquered by anybody and this degree of fierce independence has lasted and developed down through the centuries.

In what has been a mountain to climb slowly but surely Galicia is now trying to manage successfully the twin track of its regional lifestyle with a much more modern society and thankfully this appears to have had very positive results with regards to tourism with little sign of negative effects..

Viveiro can be found on the northern coast of Galicia and Northern Spain, almost mid way between Ribadeo and the naval port (and birthplace of Francisco Franco y Bahamonde better known as General Franco) of Ferrol.

It is on the part of the northern coast of Galicia known as the Rias Altas which is not as overdeveloped as the more developed and possibly better known western shores of Galicia, the Rias Baixas.

The Rias are slightly gentler and softer forms of coastal landscapes than the Norwegian Fjords but the principle is almost the same? The inlets of the Rias Altas are deep and make the almost perfect natural harbour and again almost the perfect (if not extremely chilly at times as you have to remember that this is the North Atlantic Ocean out here) points for swimming.

All of the stops on this stretch of beautiful coast, Viveiro is perhaps the best and most interesting. Viveiro is a curious place, right at the tail of the particular Ria, it is not uncommon to see small boats getting marooned on the mud flats at low tide. Viveiro is a busy place in the summer and it is not untypical to see a constant stream of tourists and holiday makers passing through.

In winter however it is a different story and has been described as a strangely lifeless. However, as they say I guess it is all down to what "floats your boat" with regards to what attracts you what makes you Tick in that sometimes there is a degree of attractiveness about being able to go somewhere that is the extremely quiet and unspoiled.

After the tourist season, Viveiro can be that place. The time of the year that perhaps Viveiro is best known is Easter. Viveiro has an Easter Festival which is quite a serious event that culminates with a candlelit procession throughout the town enacting the "Stations of the Cross".

If you happen to be in Viveiro at this time of year then this festival and possession can be quite a moving event.

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