Malaccan Architecture & Traditional Institutes (European)

By:

European Historical Heritage

Insights of the past can be gleaned from Malacca’s ancient relics that abound in the historical city.

 

o        Porta de Santiago (A’ Famosa)

This prominent landmark in Malacca was a fortress built by the Portuguese admiral, Alfonso d’Albuquerque in 1511. It was badly damaged during the Dutch invasion in 1641. Timely intervention by Sir Stamford Raffles, a British official, in 1808, saved what remains of the A’Famosa today.

Admission is free.

Tel: 06-288 3599

 

o        The Stadthuys

A major landmark in Malacca, the Stadthuys was built in 1650 as the official residence of Dutch governors and their officers.

Believed to be the oldest Dutch building in the East (circa 1641 and 1660), the Stadthuys houses the
Museum of History and Ethnography. Originally white, it was given a striking salmon-red colour to match the nearby Christ Church.

Opening hours (Museum of History and Ethnography): 9am - 6pm

Admission fee: Adult      RM5

Children RM2

Tel: 06-284 1934

 

o        Dutch Cemetery

The Dutch Cemetery was first used in the last quarter of the 17th century. Five Dutch graves and 33 British graves lie within its compound. Its use was in stages… between 1670 to 1682 and between 1818 to 1823. The Cemetery was gazetted as a national monument under the Antiquities Act 1976.

Admission is free.

Tel: 06-288 3599

 

o        St. John’s Fort

The Fort is located on St. John’s Hill, 3km from the city. It was originally a private Portuguese chapel dedicated to St. John the Baptist. Built by the Dutch during the third quarter of the 18th century, its cannon embrasures face inland as during that time, attacks on Malacca came mainly from hinterland instead of from the sea.

Admission is free.

            Tel: 06-288 3599

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