Help For Alzheimers

By: jdanf39
At this point in time there is no known cure for Alzheimer's disease. There is also no proven way of slowing the progression of the disease down. The cause is also still a mystery to us and there is nothing that can be done to prevent it. This is what is so devastating about being diagnosed with this disease.

There are a number of medications available that can help to improve the function of people living with Alzheimer's disease. If they are given early enough in the course of the disease, these medicines will help people to carry out their daily activities for a longer period of time and may prolong the time that the patients can be managed at home.

There are also medicines that are available to help them manage some of the most troubling symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. These symptoms are depression, behavioral problems, and sleeplessness. These are just a few of the symptoms that can be helped by medications.

It is usually up to the doctor to determine the method of treatment for Alzheimer's disease. Many of the Alzheimer's disease treatment plans are going to depend on the patient's age, overall health, and their medial history. They will also determine the extent of the disease, and the patient's tolerance to certain medications and therapies. Doctors will also take into account their expectations for the course of the disease and use their opinion or preference.
Acricept, Exelon, Reminyl, and Cognex seem to help those patients that have mild or moderate symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. Another drug called Namenda is prescribed for patients who have moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease. Vitamin E has also been used to slow down the progression in some patients with dementia.

Antioxidants. Several years ago, a clinical trial showed that vitamin E slowed the progress of some consequences of AD by about 7 months. Additional studies are investigating whether antioxidants, vitamins E and C, can slow AD. Another clinical trial is examining whether vitamin E and/or selenium supplements can prevent AD or cognitive decline, and additional studies on other antioxidants are ongoing or being planned.

Ginkgo biloba. Early studies suggested that extracts from the leaves of the ginkgo biloba tree may be of some help in treating AD symptoms. There is no evidence yet that ginkgo biloba will cure or prevent AD, but scientists now are trying to find out in a clinical trial whether ginkgo biloba can delay cognitive decline or prevent dementia in older people.
Estrogen. Some studies have suggested that estrogen used by women to treat the symptoms of menopause also protects the brain. Experts also wondered whether using estrogen could reduce the risk of AD or slow the disease. Clinical trials to test estrogen, however, have not shown that estrogen can slow the progression of already diagnosed AD. And one study found that women over the age of 65 who used estrogen with a progestin were at greater risk of dementia, including AD, and that older women using only estrogen could also increase their chance of developing dementia.

Scientists believe that more research is needed to find out if estrogen may play some role in AD. They would like to know whether starting estrogen therapy around the time of menopause, rather than at age 65 or older, will protect memory or prevent AD.

It is so important to know that with new research and studies, there is no reason to give up hope. There are several drugs that are being studied as well as a formula for a vaccine. These studies are important to the finding of more and more medications that are going to help the progression as well as the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.

The most important thing to remember is that there is hope for the disease. There is no reason to give up. The more the patient fights, the better chance they will have at living a normal and more functional lifestyle. Like many other diseases, there will one day be a cure for Alzheimer's disease and people will be able to live normal and healthy lives.
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