6 Home Smoking Tips for Family Allergies

By: granola
People with allergies sometimes are sensitive to cigarette or other forms of tobacco smoke. In fact, even those who don't have allergies may not care for the smell of tobacco or the resulting smoke that can irritate airways. If you or someone in your family is a smoker, you may want to take steps to limit others in the household to second-hand smoke, which has been shown to play a role in the development of lung cancer or other diseases and illnesses.

Here are some tips that may help to control the amount and effect of tobacco smoke in your home, and thus protect others from its possible negative effects.

1. Restrict smoking to one area of the house. This could be in your bedroom, the bathroom, a living room, or even outdoors on the porch or patio. Choose an area with windows, if not outside, to keep it well ventilated with a good cross breeze. Or you can stand near an open door or screen door to let the smoke escape through this route.

2. Buy smokeless ashtrays. When not puffing, set your lit cigarette in these, and they will gobble up the smoke before it fans out into the room. You'll be surprised how much cleaner and fresher the house will feel when you put one or more of these ashtrays in the rooms where you smoke tobacco products.

3. Limit your smoking to certain times of the day. You might want to do most of your puffing when the kids are asleep or out with friends. Some people crave tobacco after eating or when they are nervous while working, for example, so plan to light up more during these times, and less when the children or a non-smoking spouse is around.

4. Wash the walls once or twice a year. Unless your home's walls are covered by a product that should not come in contact with moist cleaners, choose the correct one for your paint or wallpaper finish, and follow product directions to wash down your walls. It is amazing how much of a cigarette's byproducts will cling to household fixtures like walls, and how clean and bright they will look after washing. Do the same for furniture and flooring on a regular basis to keep that pungent tobacco smell from building up in your home.

5. Close off smoking areas. If you habitually smoke in the solarium, consider having a door built to shut off this room from the rest of the house. This will help to contain the smoke to one area, making it easier to vent and clean.

6. Avoid smoking in or near the children's bedrooms and play area. Secondhand smoke has been proven to contribute to the development of ear infections, frequent respiratory ailments, and other health inhibitors.

Taking a few precautions like these can make your household environment safer, fresher, and more enjoyable to all. You don't have to spend much money or time to get the health-related results you need.
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