Hypoallergic Dog Breeds and Asthma Sufferers

By: abtlang
The first important consideration is to understand exactly what hypoallergenic dog breeds are. In short, they are breeds of dogs that are less likely to trigger allergic reactions in the humans they share their life and living space with. And since many asthma sufferers' attacks are allergy-related (i.e. triggered by contact with some different kind of allergen), then it is obvious that asthma sufferers, more than the rest of us, are always looking for ways of minimizing the possibility of allergic reactions.

Calling a dog breed hypoallergenic simply means that the dog has less potential for producing dander, an allergen that triggers asthma attacks in many people. However, it doesn't mean that they produce absolutely no dander at all, so even some of those dogs that have very little to no fur, or hair, may still cause someone that is extremely allergic to have reactions to the dog.

Dog Breeds Better Suited for Those with Allergies

On the basis of these considerations, the following breeds could be considered as more suited to be in the company of people with allergies:

* Dogs that have no hair at all, such as the American Hairless Terrier, the Chinese Crested or the Peruvian Inca Orchid
* Dogs with a single coat, including the Poodle, the Schnauzer, the Water Dog, the Kerry Blue Terrier, the Bedlington Terrier and the Bichon Friese

Other Factors to Consider

However, there are many other factors to take into account. First and foremost, if you are an asthma sufferer, do you know exactly what triggers your asthma attacks? Are they allergy-related? If so, what are the allergens that are responsible? Your doctor should be able to tell you if any kind of dog-related allergen is a cause of your asthma attacks, and, if so, whether it is dog dander. It may not be dog dander, but dog saliva, for example, and in that case a hypoallergenic dog breed is obviously not going to be any more suited to you than any other dog breed.

And if your asthma attacks are frequent and severe - and your doctor has confirmed that they are related with some kind of dog allergen - then you should simply keep away from all dogs, hypoallergenic or not.

Finally, if you are considering a hypoallergenic dog breed, you will also need to ensure that the dog still fits well within the family, not just that it has the right type of fur. Make sure to consider the fact that the dog will still need a great deal of attention and will require space and plenty of love. In the end, though, if you think a hypoallergenic dog will fit in with your family - and help reduce the chances of allergic reactions - you'll be sure of finding one that will make a wonderful pet!
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