Porcelain in Scandinavia and Russia

By: rhusain
The making and design of porcelain are quite differ from country to country. It all have its unique value and beauty. In this article you will learn more about Sandinavian and Russian made porcelain.

The Scandinavian and Russian porcelain were made with the soft paste in the initial stages and a different type of paste was also introduced for a short time and then the hard paste was used to make figures and vases like cups and mustard pots. Tableware decorated in under glaze blue. There was an Imperial factory at St Petersburg and several factories were in existence in Moscow at the end of the eighteenth century and the early nineteenth.

Scandinavia
Marieberg, near Stockholm, Sweden
A soft-paste was made here from 1766 to 1769, it is a cream-tinted glassy ware and small vases, custard cups and other pieces were made from it. A different paste was later introduced, followed for a short time by a hard-paste. Some figures were made, and more custard cups and mustard pots. The mark is usually a monogram of 'M' and 'B' sometimes with three small crowns above.

Copenhagen
A soft-paste factory operated from 1759 to 1765, but its productions are very rare. The hard-paste Royal factory began about 1771 and is still in production. Tableware, much of it decorated in under glaze blue, was made, and also many figures. The mark is three wavy lines one over the other, in under glaze blue.

Russia
The Imperial factory at St Petersburg (now Leningrad) did not begin production until about 1758 and few of the products of its early years are to be seen outside Russia. Large vases were made in the early nineteenth century and some were given as presents to ambassadors and others; they compare well with the work of European factories. Figures and groups of Russian workers and peasants were made, and these are sometimes to be seen. Several factories were in existence in Moscow at the end of the eighteenth century and in the first quarter of the nineteenth: they produced similar pieces to the Imperial establishment.

Both these Scandinavian nations and Russia craftsmen used both soft-paste and the hard-paste decorated with figures of flowers and people and also reflecting their culture and social life. But these countries did not create anything as impressive as such.The soft paste porcelain exists for some period of time but could not survive for long. In both the countries it was replaced by hard paste porcelain.
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