Tips for Entertaining a Sick Child

By: rhusain
Only parents know how difficult it can be to take care for a sick child. In this article you will find some creative way comfort and entertain your child with some light games.

If your youngster likes pets, and most of them do, try having a goldfish bowl nearby or a tiny turtle, or a tadpole or two in the bowl. Of course a bird is company too, but if you don't already have one it would run into more money than these other pets I have mentioned. Dogs are usually too active to have in the room, and cats are usually frowned upon as sickroom pets by the medicos.

If the child must have medicine on schedule, make a medicine clock out of a paper plate. Use cardboard hands secured with a metal paper fastener. Then set the hands on the medicine clock at the time when the next dose is to be taken. Place near this a real clock. When the hands on the real clock coincide with those on the medicine clock, even a rebellious youngster will think it fun to remind you that it's medicine time. At least he'll be mentally prepared for the visit of bottle and spoon.

A play clock can be made in a similar manner. Perhaps the invalid will enjoy making this second clock himself. On this clock set the hands ahead every hour. When the real clock catches up to the play clock the young patient will enjoy an automatic change of occupation.

Another interesting sickroom adjunct is a bulletin board. This needs to be no more than a large sheet of paper on the wall. On it post messages for the doctor, news from Dad's office, and cartoons snipped from the current papers or magazines.

And don't forget pinwheels or windmills. They are lots of fun for young patients. Take a piece of colored construction paper about four inches square and cut or tear from each corner to within three-fourths of an inch of the center. Pick up on the end of a pin piercing from the back to the front four alternate half corners. After you have the four half corners on the pin, put the point through the exact center of the paper and mount the wheel on the end of a stick or against some flat surface where the wind will make it whirl. The eraser end of a pencil is a good spot on which to stick your windmill.

Youngsters will spend oodles of time blowing the windmill, or the wind will blow it if it is fastened in an open window. To add variety to the windmill making, let the child use white paper and color designs on the square before it is pinned into shape.
If they are busy they are more likely not to complain and feel pain. Make them feel comfortable and fun
Kids and Teens
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 

» More on Kids and Teens