The St. Patricks Day Party

By: rhusain
Sure, 'tis a fine time to give a party St. Patrick's Day. Make it a family party invite the Caseys, the McCarthys, the Flanagans, and the O'Tooles. Include the Smiths and the Joneses, for we know, no matter what the name of your friends they will enjoy this type of fun.

Decorations are no problem with plenty of green and white tissue to cover the lights, and decorate the table. Don't neglect clay pipes and shamrocks in your decoration scheme.

Invitations need be only simple little notes printed on green shamrocks:
'Tis St. Patrick's Day We're celebrating 'Tis the wearing of the Green You'll not be forgetting March 17th, 7 P.M.

Meet your guests at the door with a big green top hat filled with numbers. This hat can be made of cardboard, or an ordinary hat can be covered with green crepe paper. Let each arriving guest draw a number from the hat green for the males and white for the women and girls with corresponding numbers.

When everyone has arrived you are all set for a bit of Irish blarney. The host or hostess calls out a man's number. He then proceeds to blarney his unknown partner by telling her, among other things, what he considers the loveliest thing about her. When he has finished his blarney the much complimented lady steps to his side.

Another number is called who in no uncertain words expresses his admiration for the "willowy slenderness" of his partner. When his corresponding number steps out they are greeted with shouts of laughter. She turns out to be the chunky young neighbor girl next door.

Keeping their partners, the entire group, with the exception of one person, forms a circle males to the left of the girls. This one person takes her place in the center of the circle. Everybody marches to the following words (tune: "We Won't Be Home Until Morning"):
Got a pig in the parlor Got a pig in the parlor Got a pig in the parlor, And he is Irish too And he is Irish too And he is Irish too, Got a pig in the parlor Got a pig in the parlor Got a pig in the parlor And he is Irish too.

The ladies continue marching in the direction in which they are going while the men turn about and go in the other direction. When this change is made the "pig" from the center joins the circle. The leader blows the whistle, and there is a scramble for new partners. One is bound to be left out and he now becomes the "pig." After several scrambles for partners the ice is pretty well broken and the whistle sounds for change of game.
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