Poles for Crappie Fishing

By: Daniel Eggertsen

There are generally two types of crappie fishing rods. There are bait casting rods and general long handled ones. The most obvious difference between these is that the bait casting rod is often a single handed rod and when handled the reel sits on top of the rod, the other has a grip that supports two hands and the reel hangs from the rod on the bottom. There are advantages to both that should always factor into your decision to purchase a fishing pole.

The single hand rod, often referred to as a bait casting pole, is designed for the comfort of a single hand as the name would suggest. In fact some brands will have left and right handed versions. These also have a "trigger" on many of the rods and if you choose one with a trigger, be sure that it is not too far or too close to the action of the reel. The trigger is important in the casting precision and distance because it gives you another leverage point and a distinct sensitive spot for feeling that gentle bite. This style can give you precision in casting but the shorter rod often means a shorter casting distance.

The two handed rods are often longer with somewhat stiffer shafts because of their overall length. These will generally use a spinner type reel or a fly reel and there is also plenty of hand room between the reel position and the butt of the rod. This gives you extra leverage to cast that bait the extra distance but sometimes lacks the precision that a single handed rod can provide.

Of course there are single handed rods that support a spinner reel. These rods place the reel support where the "trigger" would normally be. And there are rods that are primarily single handed but have an extra grip for that extra leverage and distance.

Today we find fishing rods resemble middle age swords with grips and edges, eyelet orientation, designed to kill the enemy. Think about your bait and get a rod that supports it, bait casters are for lures or jigs that required a lot of movement but the two handed longer poles work great with jigs that involve a rest period.

You can find rods from as low as ten dollars to hundreds of dollars. I have always found a rod that was in the $20 - $30 range. These rods would generally support my fishing habits but also stand up to my transport and storage habits, which are never too gentle.

Many of your big outfitters have their "brand" of rods, these rods are bought from generic manufactures that produce many of the bigger brand names and the same rod for the other big outfitter. These generic rods are fairly good but consider them a disposable item that will last you two or three years under normal usage. If you catch that trophy fish on one you might consider retiring. As with all rods, flexing causes tiny little fractures and will eventually snap, and this will always happen at the worst possible time.

If you are considering a sectional rod make sure that it locks together correctly and will not come apart with normal use. Sectional rods can provide extra length and ease of storage and transport. But once again trust me that there is nothing worse than casting your bait to the perfect spot promptly followed by the upper half of your rod, then followed by a snag that breaks your line. I must have a dozen half rods from this scenario or one similar to it.

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