How to Reel In Big Bass in Texas

By: Daniel Eggertsen

We've been receiving a lot of questions asking me about fishing for bass in Texas, and it's no wonder why the state is so popular for fishing with its over 6000 reservoirs and almost 5000 square miles of inland water.

Before you head off for a Texas fishing adventure, first we need to cover a few things, such as pests you'll find. Black widow and brown recluse spiders are known to frequent Texas, along with scorpions, centipedes, fire ants, and a plethora of flying, stinging insects. Additionally, copperheads, rattlesnakes and the Texas Coral Snake may all be living close to where you visit, so be prepared by arming yourself with knowledge on what to treat and how to treat it. A first aid kit combined with some special items just for the area you are traveling to is never a bad thing to bring along, especially if you will be taking children along with you.

Now don't let some friendly cautionary advice turn your head away from Texas, as dangerous and painful pests can and do reside all over the place elsewhere, too. The best thing about Texas fishing is the selection, and here are some great places to start looking:

Caddo Lake used to be a natural lake that received quite a bit of expansion upon the building of a dam on Cypress Creek. Caddo Lake is a great beginner's area to catch loads of bass all day and year long, but only if size doesn't matter so much to you. Over 6 pounds per is pushing expectations here, but the scenery is beautiful and the bounty is plentiful. Check the Cyprus trees at Caddo Lake to find some great hiding spots.

Lake Fork is an excellent place to find a record catch. Beautiful, spacious, and plenty of hiding spots, this lake is definitely where its at, but the fish here are wise and require a great deal of trickery to be caught. My advice here is to sneak out at night without motor and catch them when their guard is down.

Lake Sam Rayburn, with its treasure cove full of hiding spots and structure, has long been a winning area in Texas, and doesn't show any signs of losing in the near future. A vast, scenic area close enough to civilization to mix up a family fishing trip with some city life, this lake has what its got to get great amounts of great-looking and great-tasting bass almost year round, although I suggest during the week when things are slow.

Toledo Bend is just about as good as it gets for cover, even rivaling Lake Sam Rayburn in size and structure. Another beautiful area, this reservoir is partially in Louisiana and is fed by a large number of creeks as well as the Sabine River. The best place in the spring is just on the other side of where the Sabine River empties out into the reservoir, particularly any large muddy areas off to the side of the river, but be careful of the current.

The Rio Grande River empties out into Amistad, which can be a great place for the experienced bass fisher, but beginners need to either steer clear of the area or only go with a seasoned guide. Not only is this fertile topwater area only a potent spot if you know what to look for, but it can also be dangerous with the winds that frequent the area for a good part of the year. Even an experienced boater in a small enough boat can get tipped here!

And that's just a drop on the bucket of what Texas has to offer.

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