Wooden Baseball Bats - From Wood to Aluminum

By: Jeremy Tang

In professional baseball, metal bats are not allowed. Wooden baseball bats are standard; heavy wooden bats in fact. If a player fills a wooden bat with cork so as to decrease its weight, he would be violating the rules. Before aluminum there was always wood. There is no doubt that key advantages come into play when swinging with wooden baseball bats.

Wooden baseball bats are actually safer than metal bats anyhow, because metal bats send the ball out at a greater velocity and thus increase the risk of injury to anyone who may get in the way. These proffered baseball bats of the pros are made from ash and other types of wood, especially maple wood (record-setting hitter Barry Bonds used a bat made out of maple wood). Wooden bats really haven't changed much over the past hundred years. Besides from being more catchy to the eye, these types of bats still rely on tested and proven principles that continue to manifest today.

While metal bats are all the rage with younger players and are even required for certain leagues, the old-fashioned wooden bat will not be fading out anytime soon. The simple fact of feeling that wooden grip makes all the difference. After all, it is because they are so much more challenging to use than aluminum bats and the like, that they are so popular. Baseball bat manufacturer Hillerich and Bradsby even purchased Larimer and Norton, Inc., a lumber company, so as to keep their wooden baseball bats in efficient supply. This is a clear indication that we can only expect to see the wooden baseball bat industry grow with increased force.

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