Shammed Unconciousness In Jiu-Jitsu Exposed

By: Jimmy Cox

In a system of combat where strategy is as highly developed as it is in jiu-jitsu it is to be expected that the student will have to deal with the problem of shamming by his opponent. Indeed, the jiu-jitsian never hesitates to sham when by so doing he can gain any advantage.

The only shamming that is regarded as being dishonorable is for one contestant to pretend to surrender, and then to take instant advantage of the cessation of his punishment by making an unlooked-for attack upon his adversary. But shammed unconsciousness is a trick in which no surrender has been proclaimed. If the victor in a bout can be deceived into believing that his victim has been rendered unconscious, and if the victor is bared thus into relaxing his vigilance, it is wholly proper to take advantage of his carelessness.

For this reason it often becomes necessary to know whether an opponent is only pretending to have been deprived of his senses. The method of investigating this is an ingenious and effective one, and has the further excuse that it will restore consciousness in light attacks of fainting.

The assailant throws himself on the ground beside his adversary. With the tips of one finger the aggressor jabs the suspected pretender lightly and repeatedly in the solar plexus, while the investigator's other hand is employed in giving the shoulder pinch. The unremitting jabs in the plexus are in themselves enough to fill a shammer with a very lively desire to leap to his feet and thus deliver himself from the nauseating, nerve-wracking prodding. And the pain caused by the shoulder pinch completes the pretender's earnest desire to escape further torment by surrender.

It takes but very little time for the student to make himself master of this shoulder pinch. The thumb is pressed into the front side of the top of the shoulder, while the grip is kept by grasping with the fingers at the back of the shoulder. A very little practice upon his own shoulder will show a jiu-jitsian just where the spot is that is hyper-sensitive to the pinch with the thumb. Bear in mind that the ball of the thumb should dig in at the point where the head of the upper arm joins the scapula.

Often this pinch can be employed by itself and not in combination. If the assailant secures a good grip in this fashion, keeping his own body as far away from return attack as possible, the victim is often forced to draw back out of striking distance.

Still another value of this shoulder pinch will be suggested to the investigating student. Often, in a throw, the victim will fall upon one side. It is an advantage to the aggressor to have his man lying face downward. In that case the shoulder pinch should be applied roughly to the shoulder on the ground.

The pain is so intense that the victim rolls over on his face in order to weaken the force of the pinch. If he does the assailant must take prompt advantage by kneeling with one knee in the back of his opponent and the other knee across the back of one of the upper arms of the prostrate one.

Now, the wrist of the arm that is so pinned must be seized, and the arm forced upward with a strong pull. As the upper portion of the arm is pinned by a knee, and the front side of the arm is downward, the victim's arm is forced through that painful process of which so much has been said, the process of "bending the wrong way." And the result of this excruciating torment is unconditional and prompt surrender on the part of the now helpless victim.

Thus has the jui-jitsian not only gained the upper hand but has also proved to his own satisfaction that his opponent is only shamming!

Martial Arts
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