How To Buy An Indoor Basketball Hoop

By: William Smith

If you plan to buy on the Internet, stores are responsible for providing you with correct and current prices. Sales taxes and shipping costs are estimates; please check store for exact amounts. Product specifications are obtained from merchants or third parties. Although most stores make every effort to present accurate information, they may not be responsible for inaccuracies. We encourage you to ask before you buy and get it in writing.

An indoor basketball hoop needs to be selected after deciding its place of installation. If the hoop is to be installed on a wall then it should be one that has an opaque backboard. The transparent, Plexiglas backboards merge with the wall causing problems for the players. Another feature to be considered is the width of backboards. Wider backboards allow better play because the players can hit a wider array of bank shots.

Attention should also be paid to the way the hoop is attached to the backboard. The hoop can be attached to the backboard with a single piece of metal or it can have a spring-loaded breakaway section. Those players who want to dunk or hang on to the rim should prefer the breakaway model.

The indoor hoop should be installed in a place where a court can be painted. If the space is not enough to paint a full court then at least a half-court or a free throw line should be painted beneath it. An indoor hoop without a throw line has little utility.

An indoor hoop can also be mounted in the center of a hall. Such an arrangement provides more moving space to players, who can run around the pole after dunking or scoring a point. There is less danger of crashing into a wall while throwing a practice ball on the run or leaping to score a point from a position that is close to the hoop.

Both portables and in-ground systems can be considered to mount an indoor hoop. The only problem with an in-ground system is that it becomes a permanent structure. The floor has to be broken, and plastered again if the position of the in-ground system is to be changed. The portable systems, in contrast, do not suffer from this limitation. Their positions can be changed.

One more feature that should be kept in mind is offset. This distance from the pole to the backboard defines the play area underneath the basket. Short offsets can be dangerous, especially in enclosed spaces. It is best to have hoops where the offset ranges from 2 feet to 4 feet.

Recreation and Sports
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 

» More on Recreation and Sports
 



Share this article :
Click to see more related articles