Facial Moisturizers and Eye Creams

By: Alien

Moisturizers do Two Things: trap moisture below your skin's outer layer and soften skin's outer layer. This moisture and added softness makes dry ?or just dehydrated - skin temporarily feel better, look better, and behave better. Like other skin-care products, however, there is no such thing as a one-formula-fits-all moisturizer. Here, we offer you a moisturizing primer.

Facial moisturizers

There is a dizzying array of facial moisturizers out there: gels, serums, lotions, creams, and balms. Some come in tubes, others in pump bottles, jars, or tubs. There are lightweight formulas for skin that doesn't need a lot of hydration and heavy-duty formulas for severely dehydrated skins. And there are moisturizers at all points between, some even with treatment ingredients designed to temporarily repair damaged skin. For the consumer, the choice can be confusing. Unlike cleanser, which doesn't spend a lot of time on skin, moisturizer remains on skin all day. For that reason, it's important to research and experiment until you find one your skin responds well to. Keep in mind, however, that not everyone needs moisturizer. (I realize this is not what the lady at the cosmetics counter told you.) Oily and even some normal complexions have enough sebum - the body's own natural moisturizer - to trap moisture and soften skin; for these skins, adding something from a jar is overkill.

If qou live in a humid area and have a dry or normal complexion, your skin may turn slick and greasy in the summer. If this sounds familiar, try going without moisturizer during the hotter months of summer.

Eye creams

Eye creams are typically lighter in texture than most facial moisturizers and are formulated not to harm the eye's delicate tissues. I was a loyal eye-cream user during my young adult years, when my face was too oily for a moisturizer yet I needed something to address the slight dryness under my eyes. I am no longer an eye-cream user. The moisturizer I use on my face is the same one that gets patted under my eyes.

I realize that not everyone agrees with this. Many cosmetic-company salespeople and aestheticians - including my own facialist - strongly believe in using a separate cream for the eye area. Yet I know just as many dermatologists - including my own doctor? who think it's fine to use one moisturizer on all parts of your face. As long as, may I add, that moisturizer doesn't contain treatment ingredients that can irritate the delicate skin around the eye.

Throat creams

Throat creams are a bit like eye creams - some people find them helpful, but they're not necessary. Because the neck has fewer oil glands than the face, it is frequently drier. To help combat this drier texture, throat creams are often heavier than facial creams. Many also contain ingredients to temporarily firm skin, creating a tighter, younger look. If you consider your neck a problem area, go ahead and try a throat cream. However, if your medicine cabinet is already packed with skin-care products you don't use, a throat cream might become one more product to gather dust.

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