Which Golf Clubs Should you Buy?

By: Lee Macrae

With so many different makes and types of golf clubs on the market, it is no wonder beginners, let alone the more experienced golfer, can become easily confused when it comes to buying clubs.

Well, here are a few things to consider on your next trip to the golf store for new clubs.

To begin with, it can be stated that "off the shelf" golf clubs will work for nearly everybody standing between 5 feet and six feet tall. And that holds equally for males and females. If you are taller or shorter than that, then you should look at custom made clubs.

Cast or Forged Clubs?

Well, the best answer is usually "cast iron".

Why do we say that? Very simply because standard cast iron clubs tend to have a larger "sweet spot". This is the are in the center of the club face where "forces" are said to be perfectly balanced to deliver the perfect shot. The bigger the sweet spot, the better chance of hitting it every time. It makes it a little easier to hit the "bulls eye" every time on your shots. It is for that main reason the beginners are steered towards cast iron clubs. Until their swing plane is more developed, they will have an easier time striking the ball on a consistant basis. That is why you see a lot of oversized club heads on the market today. They allow average duffers the opportunity of striking the ball well and getting great drives more often.

By contrast, forged iron golf clubs are "harder to hit" with as they have a smaller sweet spot.

So why are forged clubs even sold?

Because the "softer" forged metal gives the golfer a better feel than the harder cast iron. The more seasoned player, especially the pros on the circuit, don't need that larger sweet spot. They have a more consistant swing plane and strike the ball with far more accuracy. They use the "feel" of the the forged iron clubs to influence the flight of the ball in a way that a beginner or average player can't.

The shaft of the club is your next thing to look at. Specifically the material it will be made from. Basically, you have steel or composite shafts

The significant factor here is club head speed. A typical golfer will have a club velocity between 80-94 mph. A slower swing speed means you had better think of using a shaft made from composite material, not steel. With a slower swing speed comes less distance on your drives. Less distance means more shots needed to reach the putting green. Not a good thing if you want to lower your score. And that is where the composite golf club shaft enters the picture. It gives you a lot more distance than you would get with your normal swing and a steel shaft.

By contrast, those with good distances on their shots, will fare much better by using a steel shaft that will give them some touch and control on their shots.

In order to determine your personal swing, look for a sports shop or golf store that has speed sensor equipment and get yourself clocked.

With just these few starting tips, it is usually best if you rent a few different sets of clubs as you play and take note of how each club helps or hinders your game. You are looking to determine your personal strengths and weaknesses. Try the various types and kinds of clubs available to you and, in time, you will be able to narrow in on what will work best for you and which clubs offer the best advantages to improve your golf score.

Never stop understanding and tweaking your own golf game.

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