Starter Helps Power Up the Engine

By: Anthony Fontanelle

When the automobile was first introduced, drivers need to manually crank a lever to start the engine. Fortunately, today's motorists can now do this with ease. The Jurassic method of initiating a car has been replaced with the modern starter that uses an electric motor to power up the starter drive. The starter is made to convert torque as well as engage the ring gear of the flywheel. Usually installed at the rear end of the engine or at the front end of the transmission box, the starter also functions as a gear reduction device capable of increasing the torque output.

The starter works by converting electricity into mechanical energy in two stages. Turning the ignition switch on will release a little quantity of power from the battery to the solenoid above the starter. Through the magnetic field, a pulling force that brings the solenoid plunger forward is created. The attached shift yoke will then move to the starter drive as the pinion gear meshes with the engine's crankshaft flywheel. Once the plunger has done its work, it will make a connection which will fuel a larger amount of current to flow from the battery to the starter. Thereafter, the motor will spin the drive and turn the meshed gears. This will give the needed power and prepare the cylinders for ignition. One the engine has started, the ignition is released to break the starting circuit. The starter motor then shuts off automatically and disengages the starter drive when the solenoid's magnetic field collapses and the return spring pulls the plunger back.

To keep vehicle performance at its peak, the needs to operate efficiently. Having it checked once in a while is a good maintenance procedure. Experts advise to check the vehicle's battery cables at every oil change, making sure that the cables are free from rust and are working properly. Rusty or loose battery connections may result to cranking, arcing to cable connectors, and numerous electrical problems.

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