Control Arm: Key Acura Suspension Part

By: Evander Klum

The control arm, also called wishbone suspension, installed on the Acura drive train is a flat and roughly triangular subframe used by the wheels to pivot while accelerating. Designed with both broad and narrow ends, the Acura control arm attaches the wheels to the drive shaft and forms an assembly that provides steering capability. The broad end of the Acura control arm is connected to the chassis and pivots on a bushing or cylindrical linings that reduce friction and restrains the auto parts from going in all directions. During acceleration the broad end of the Acura control arm manages the motion of the wheel and synchronizes it with the body of the car. The narrow end, on the other hand, attaches to the steering knuckle while pivoting on a ball joint.

In an Acura, up to eight control arms are fitted-with two on each wheel. They consist of an upper control arm and a lower control arm. The lower control arms provide the suspension setting parts with a rotational movement whenever the car is cornering. It complements the suspension system in dispersing chassis flex for convenient riding. Other than the aforementioned functions, the enables the coil springs to respond to the axle and wheel assembly while encountering the bumps and bruises along the way. The pivots at the other end of the control arm, which are attached to the chassis, allow for the up-and-down motion of the coil springs to absorb the shocks during bumps

Aside from its pivot-joint functionality, the Acura control arm likewise allows the suspension of the car to respond to the axle and wheel assembly during bumps. The pivots at either end of the Acura control arm facilitate an upward and downward motion of the coil springs so bumps are less felt in the car's cabin. By allowing a steady, regulated movement of the suspension parts, the Acura control arm synchronizes all four tires to the motion of the car. It is equipped with cylindrical bushings to reduce friction and improve car handling. The considerably less-traction contact surface where the rubber meets the road results in better steering and tire wear-out rate.

Top Searches on
Car Parts
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 

» More on Car Parts
 



Share this article :
Click to see more related articles