Australias New Anti-speed Ads Chides Boy Racers

By: Rain Stockton

A man that drives his car - be it a hot Ferrari or a Nissan 300ZX (with upgraded ) - with reckless abandon that girls swooned over him and his very attractive devil may care ways.

But that soon may change. In Sydney, that is - with the launch of an Australian road safety campaign this month linking penis size to driving behavior.

In the television and print advertisements, young women who waggle their little fingers at speeding drivers elicit a shamefaced response from crestfallen boy racers. The latest TV campaign to encourage drivers to respect speed limits also features an elderly woman using the signal, as well as other young men who are not in the driver's seat.

The campaign has so far received mixed reviews from the Sydney-folk.

"To me, it says 'Speeding - no-one thinks big of you' and it will cause people who are speeding to think twice about the image they are creating," road safety authority spokesman John Whelan said.

The usual blood-and-gore car crash scenes, further explains Whelan, had lost their impact because of even more graphic images on the nightly news and in computer games and horror films.

Whelan also noted that according to the authority's research, young males were becoming desensitized to the shocking images of fatal road crashes used in past Australian road safety campaigns.

In New South Wales however, state parliamentarian Andrew Fraser indicated that suggesting penis size was in inverse proportion to driving speed was not enough to change bad habits saying, "Just having a campaign that says a bloke's manhood is smaller than what he thinks it is might be funny, but in a proper education campaign you need to cover all aspects of the dangers of driving a vehicle."

The campaign apparently didn't sit well with Harold Scuby, chairman of the Pedestrian Council, either. He said that the money would be better spent "targeting offenders by using new enforcement technologies than making the community pay for these campaigns."

The ?850 million ($A2 million) campaign has been the result of widespread public concern in Sydney over a series of multiple road fatalities involving young, inexperienced male drivers still on their restricted, provisional driving licenses. Speed has been a factor in many of the recent accidents.

Sydney's young drivers -- known as 'P platers', will from next month have additional restrictions placed on their driving licenses including a complete ban on hands free mobile phone use in their cars as well as the exclusion of young passengers from their vehicles at night.

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