Turbo - How Does it Work ?

By: BoostTown.com

This a article from

Your #1 Source For How To Increase Your Cars Performance

Visit us to find more articles will color pictures that aid in the clarification of the various automotive components

For the full article go here:



-------------

The turbo (also known as turbocharger) has been around for many years, almost as long as the internal combustion engine itself. A turbocharger, has two wheels on it. One is called the turbine and this sits in the exhaust system. The exhaust gas leaving the engine causes the turbine and the shaft fixed to it, to spin.

On the other hand of the shaft is the impellor, or compressor wheel. This pulls air in and the forces into the engine. For this to work effectively, the impellor wheel typically spins at 120,000 - 150,000 RPM (Revolutions Per Minute).

Many kinds of bearings used at these high rotational speeds need lubrication and cooling systems. The turbocharger's lubrication system can be an isolated system or receive oil from the engine's oil supply. For cooling the lubrication system may double as the cooling system, separate coolant may be pumped through the center housing from an outside source such as the engine coolant system, or the turbine may be air cooled. An oil lubrication and water cooling system using engine oil and engine coolant are commonplace in automotive applications. Special kinds of bearings, e.g. foil bearings, can reduce or eliminate the need for lubrication and reduce the cooling requirement.

Turbos rely on the flow of the exhaust gas through the turbine housing, they only start to spin after ignition has taken place and so there is a delay between opening the throttle and the turbo spinning and producing boost. This is known as 'turbo lag' and is considered to be a downside compared to superchargers.

The turbine and impeller are each contained within their own housing on opposite sides. These housings collect and direct the gas flow. The size and shape can dictate some performance characteristics of the overall turbocharger. The area of the cone to radius from center hub is expressed as a ratio (AR, A/R, or A:R). Often the same basic turbocharger assembly will be available from the manufacturer with multiple AR choices for the turbine housing and sometimes the compressor cover as well. This allows the designer of the engine system to tailor the compromises between performance, response, and efficiency to application or preference.

Top Searches on
Car Parts
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 

» More on Car Parts