Volvos New Safety Technology

By: Evander Klum

The Volvo renowned for its safety vehicles is back with new safety technology which is guaranteed so as they claimed to reduce car accidents.

Volvo's treasure trove of safety features includes the first laminated windscreens which were introduced in 1944, the lap-sash seatbelt launched in 1959, and the driver's airbag in 1987. These safety features have been around for many years and have been implemented by various automakers as standard safety features of their vehicles. Volvo's safety features were created before any legislative requirements were made. Through the years the Swedish-based subsidiary of Ford has continuously improve its car safety technology which are employed to its latest range of Volvos.

Among the new safety features that Volvo has created are the following: Driver Alert Control system which alerts tired as well as inattentive drivers, the LDW system or the Lane Departure Warning system, and a collision warning system with an automatic brake function that prevents front-to-rear impacts.

The aforementioned safety features are now being implemented on Volvo vehicles. Take for instance the new S80 which is equipped with a collision warning system with brake support. According to the Swedish automaker the next in line is an auto brake system. The LDW is offered separately from the blind-spot camera system which is offered as an option for local Volvos.

Todd Hallenbeck Volvo Cars Australia spokesman said that the Swedish automaker has recently become particularly focused on safety particularly in terms of preventive safety.

Volvo has based the development of its new safety technology on the research that shows around 90 percent of all crashes attributed to drivers being distracted. The DAC system, together with the LDW system - are samples of the safety features that Volvo created to address such particular problem. These safety features are part of the option package called the Driver Alert System which was introduced late last year in Europe particularly for Volvo models such as the S80, V70, and the XC70.

Ingrid Skogsmo Volvo Cars Safety Centre Director said that safety is the key philosophy of the company. She also said as quoted by Cars Guide: "When it comes to preventive safety, we have the same approach as when we develop protective systems. In other words, Volvo's safety research and technical development focuses on areas where new technology can create significant positive results in real-life traffic."

Volvo the producer of high quality has created the DAC after studies showed that driver fatigue is a major safety concern around the world. The studies were conducted by Monash University Accident Research Centre in 1998. Their studies showed that around 25 percent and 35 percent of fatal crashes in Australia were attributed to fatigue. And basing on the data they've collected, the figures are likely to go higher especially for some types of crashes such as those similar to fatal single-vehicle semi-trailer crashes.

The DAC system is activated at 65km/h and continues to be active even above 60km/h. the camera, sensors as well as the control unit, monitors the behavior of the driver. The camera also measures the distance between the car and its relation to the road lane markings.

And if for some reason the driver swerve off the road an audible signal is given alerting the driver. There is also a text message that appears in the car's information display such as a coffee cup symbol which means that driver should take a break.

The DAC works hand-in-hand with the LDW which the Swedish automaker claimed can prevent around 30 percent to percent of single-vehicle crashes between 70km/h and 100km/h. The LDW gives off a warning chime whenever a driver crosses the road markings for no reason. Likewise, the collision warning with auto-brake function slows down the car whenever it senses an imminent impact.

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