Volvo Lks: Keeping your Vehicle Straight on the Road

By: Glady Reign

The Volvo brand has been in the industry for decades already and it sure has proven that it can stay in the game with their own share of perks that would take in the market's attention. Volvo has been providing the market with vehicles that do provide the utmost safety and sure enough, that seems like the kind of products that the consumers want. And this is very true not only for Volvo Cars but also for its sister Volvo Trucks.

Safety systems have been one of the utmost concerns for Volvo and they are much especially applying it when creating heavy trucks. And because of such a goal, the brand has been able to create breakthroughs and milestones in the industry. Of course, there is the use of to keep the vehicle on the road, the use of the safety cab, the utilization of seat belts as standard features, and the creation of the collapsible steering wheel column.

Claes Avedal is one of the head researchers for Volvo Trucks' team that focuses on accidents and Avedal expresses, "The fast pace of technological development these past few years has created entirely new opportunities when it comes to accident-preventive safety. One good example is the implementation of the active stability-enhancing program, ESP, one of the most important advances in this area. With our new systems, we are taking yet another step in the right direction."

One of the most recent safety technologies used for the current breed of Volvo trucks is the Lane Keeping Support (LKS) which comes as a system that monitors all of the lane marker lines. This system becomes activated once the vehicle starts speeding at 60 kph. When the vehicle is about to go off the lane, the system would then alert the driver.

Avedal furthermore explains the system, "Situations where the truck leaves its current lane for one reason or another are behind a large proportion of all truck accidents and is also the most common reason for frontal collisions with other vehicles. Using this system can now significantly reduce the risk of lane changing accidents."

Jenny Blomqvist is Volvo Trucks' product manager for electronics for in-cabs and she does recall, ""We had a prototype ready back in 2004 and now, after a comprehensive series of tests to ensure the system's functionality, we're ready to launch it on the market. This type of system should be regarded as assistance for the driver and should under no circumstances be perceived as causing irritation. For example, it is important that the system never gives false warnings for roadside fences, lamp-posts or irregularities in the road surface. It should also be easy for the driver to handle and understand, so that is why we've invested immense resources in developing a system that offers truly high precision and excellent functionality."

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