Streetfighter Motorcycle Building: Thinking Outside the Box

By: Shaun Kelly

So we have the basics of swapping tail sections, installing flat bars, changing lights, etc....

But what about the parts that bolt to these parts?

And the parts that bolt to those parts? And so on and so forth.

Basically what I'm getting at is there are so many ideas that we could implement into our builds.

Let's take some ideas form the German scene to start. They have some of the most detailed bikes around. They use a large amount of custom billet parts that have been designed to clean up all the OEM plastic and roughcast parts that come out of the factory.

Fork covers are starting to become more common among many of the show bikes. A cue taken from the cruiser crowd that cleans up the front end. Most often matching the diameter of the triple clamps creates more of a seamless look from top to bottom. Also staying at the front end is integrated risers and bar clamps. Still using flat bars, but without the obtrusiveness of risers sticking up in the air. The riser cap is made to look flat against the clamp either on top or on the front side of the clamp.
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Another neat look that has been popping up a lot more. Billet brake reservoirs. Get that ugly hunk of plastic off the bike. These pieces either just replace the plastic cup or can bolt into the master cylinder itself for more of a one-piece look.?
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A low buck version of this has been used on race bikes for many years. A capped off clear tube filled with fluid acts as the ressy. The neat part about this, aside from its weight saving quality, is it can be made as big or small as you like. A small piece of solid wire bent to position inside the tube aids in rigidity and allows it to be positioned in almost any direction.

The next level to this idea is building the reservoir into the handlebars. A look at the Gregg's Customs Hellion gives a great example of this mod.??
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Since we are talking about hiding things, what about all those cables? Another look to the chopper crowd gives us a neat solution. Internal throttle setups have been copied and reproduced to a much more affordable price range. The down side is they are rarely made to fit 7/8 bars. But I have your solution:

Once upon a time Honda offered the CT70 mini bike that used and internal throttle assembly. And guess what? It was a 7/8 diameter. The best part is it is still available and for the low low price of $25.99 you too can have this super clean super trick part that all the cool kids are doing.
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These can be purchased from various websites, such as: . I have also run across some billet versions on ebay, but they are rare and quite a bit more. And while you're at it, why not go for that ultra clean look and put one on the clutch side too!???
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Speaking of swapping tail sections. We all want that ultra slick piece of plastic to make our ass look good. The aftermarket stuff is rare and expensive. Some have gone the way of seriously modifying OEM plastic, some have made their own from foam molds and fiberglass. I'm totally for these ideas. It's a great exercise in creativity. For those of us that my not have honed these skills yet there are other options. Look at other alternatives. Pocket bikes for example. A lot of the mid size bikes are copies of some of the more popular full size bikes. They're just much smaller. Best part is they are cheap. Most can be had for around $40. Also, some of the oddball scooters offer really neat taillights and surrounds that can be made to work with a little thought and ingenuity. Keep your eyes peeled. There may be things you never thought of before.

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