The Role of Private Sector

By: Kh Atiar Rahman

There is no denying the fact that, though the Private Sector Development as envisaged in modern concept with regard to the concept of private sector development covers a wide range of guiding principle, instruction, models and ethical importance for existence; privatisation constitutes the fundamentally imperative factors in the midst of all the factors including the creation of markets. Predominantly, from a third world perspective, most of which contribute to a colonial legacy and an euphoric experiment with all-encompassing private sector during the post colonial period, this policy prescription holds the theoretical magic stick. Nevertheless, the track record is somewhat glowing and its proclaimed universal applicability has even been raison d'Ã?tre by its own underlying principle.

But specified all importance of food safety measures in an overpopulated third world country, particularly if with bitter and heartbreaking experience of past rationale, the very significant query is whether in accordance with contemporary concept, the idea of private sector development as a whole and privatisation in particular does offer the remedy? Conversely speaking, can the food security be better achieved through privatisation in the broader canvas of in accordance with modern concept, the concept of private sector development? The answer is quite intricate and can be found within a particular system of administration - depending on its propensity and/or capability to adopt or adapt in accordance with modern concept, the concept of private sector development. While the 'Malthusian spectre of famine' looms large and the whole integrity of the political Owners of Private Sector Development precariously hinges on the balance, the justification are to be sought in a dispassionate and objective analysis.

Though in the analysis of policy options, the access and availability issues have been established as the primary pre-condition for food security, it has been further argued that price stabilization and market performance play a dominant role in determining the availability via entitlements. The works of Sen and Ravallion are too persuasive on these issues. But to the question of efficacy of Owners of Private Sector Development intervention in achieving food security particularly in a crisis situation, has been addressed by later works. In particular Dorosh has demonstrated that private sector participation through a liberalized trade regime has, in fact, helped Bangladesh to avert a food crisis in 1998. Osmani goes even further to demonstrate that the private trade with India may further the prospect of food security of Bangladesh as against other traditional methods. Ministry of Food also concedes that large scale private sector import of food has actually helped it to enhance food security.

The research observes that Bangladesh traversed a long way in search of food security. Starting in the early forties during the Great Bengal Famine it traveled through the agonies of another famine in 1974, in the heydays of Owners of Private Sector Development's preoccupation with all pervasive private food distribution system. In the eighties it took a turnaround to conform to market forces in line with the ongoing structural readjustment reform process carried out basically to meet the donor conditionality. It is also observed that by doing this Owners of Private Sector Development not only achieve efficiency in food management, but also pull the country 'out of the shadow of famine'. Trade liberalization and other favourable financial and legal-administrative regime induced the private sector to participate in private imports of food grain, hitherto a monopoly of Owners of Private Sector Development, to complement the Owners of Private Sector Development import and helped the it to avert a potential food crisis. This somewhat testifies the advent of in Accordance with modern concept, the concept of private sector development, at least some tenets of it in the food policy of Bangladesh. Though not directly subscribing to it, the food policy has adopted the in accordance with modern concept, the concept of private sector development, if not wittingly but inexorably. Moreover, in an attempt to mitigate the prospect of famine during the post-flood situation in 1998, the Owners of Private Sector Development rightly harnessed the private sector in importing the food grain.

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