A Brief Introduction to Barossa Valleys History

By: Jason Keiller

In 1837 the Barossa Valley was named by South Australia's first Surveyor General, Colonel William Light. The area's name comes from a location with the same name in Spain. Barossa was first settled in 1842 by German and English settlers. The largest group was German as they had just escaped religious persecution, and within months the area had become full of German culture that has stayed right up to today and which is sure to remain into the future.

Settlements were established in Bethany in 1842 and followed closely by Angaston, Krondorf, Ebenezer, Penrice, Light Pass & Langmeil. Langmeil being settled in 1843 by German Lutherans with Pastor Kavel, more settlements began and Lutheran Church spires rose all over the region.

Settlers in the Barossa Valley were considered to be hard working people, immigrants with real value to the area and South Australia. English, Irish and Scottish also settled in the area and attended Catholic, Anglican and Methodist churches.

Germans were the most dominant culture to set up in the valley. They were strong in festivals, customs, religion, songs, food, houses, and language with some elderly people still speaking German today. For over 100 years Germans have continued to uphold their culture in the region of Barossa Valley.

Living standards were difficult for the early settlers with tents commonplace and dug outs and huts made of wattle and daub. With the hard work and prosperity of the area settlers soon built quarry dug stone and built homes with thick walls to keep cool and last the test of time. Many homes from the 1860's are still used today and are renovated and maintained.

The first naturalised German settler to Barossa was naturalised on 24 th May 1839, Europe was experiencing financial hardship so during the 1840 and 50's many more Germans arrived into the Barossa Valley. The German language remained the main language for many years due to the leadership of the Lutheran Church and a desire to retain German community. German educated was encouraged in the schools in order to help preserve the German heritage in the Barossa.

In 1847 a German newspaper was produced known as the Die Australische Deutsche Zeitung. The paper was the brain child of Johann Menge and Carl Kornhardt.

The Barossa Valley is located less than 90 minutes from Adelaide International Airport and cars can be rented from the airport or you can take a tour from Adelaide City and check out all of the cellar doors and eateries. Make sure you head up Mengler's Hill to see all of Barossa from a great vantage point. If you require more information contact your local hotel as they will be more than happy to assist you with your tour of Adelaide.

Author: Jason Keiller

Europe Properties
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 

» More on Europe Properties
 



Share this article :
Click to see more related articles