Burj Dubai Tower Discussion

By: Marta Thompson

Today the city of Dubai is one of the wealthiest and most modern anywhere, boasting the highest skyline in the Middle East including the two of the tallest hotels in the world and luxury Dubai property. Today shiny new skyscrapers reflect the mosques and wind towers of Old Dubai. The world's tallest building, which is still under construction in the booming Gulf emirate of Dubai, has become the world's tallest free-standing structure.
The Burj Dubai tower is now 555 meters (1,831.5 feet) tall and has surpassed the 553-metre- (1,824.9-feet) CN Tower in Toronto, Canada, which held the record for the world's tallest free-standing structure since 1976.
The developer announced in July that Burj Dubai, Arabic for Dubai Tower, had exceeded Taiwan's Taipei 101 which is 508 meters (1,676.4 feet) tall, to become the tallest building in the world.
Burj Dubai is being built primarily by immigrant engineers and workers from Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, China and the Philippines. Construction of what will be world's tallest building was stopped briefly on Wednesday, March the 22nd. Workers at the building angered by the low wages paid, made a demonstration and caused damage to property, valued at around one million dollars.

The United Arab Emirates dirham's close connection with the low US Dollar, and the increased cost-of-living in the region, has made it increasingly difficult for immigrant construction workers to survive on their wages.
In a 2006 report on the UAE's treatment of migrant workers, entitled Building Towers, Cheating Workers, Human Rights Watch documented abuses in UAE such as, "extremely low wages, several years of indebtedness to recruitment agencies for fees that UAE law says only employers should pay, the withholding of employees' passports, and hazardous working conditions that result in apparently high rates of death and injury."
In October of last year, Human Rights Watch delivered specific recommendations to the UAE government for improvement of working conditions. The UAE government acted swiftly on the report and put in place several improvements, which were applauded by Human Rights Watch. However, the salaries of migrant construction workers remain in the range from $106 to $250 per month, while the national average wage is over $2,000 per month. Trade unions remain illegal in the UAE.
Looking at this example we can see that construction on a large scale has turned Dubai into one of the fastest growing cities in the world offering various types of Dubai property, equaled only by the large Chinese cities. But is such development worth of people suffering? We shouldn't forget about human rights, and create good conditions not only for businessmen and tourists who is ready to invest money in Dubai property, but also people who contract this property in Dubai. Remember that the UAE is currently undergoing a dramatic construction boom, and nearly all of the more than 500,000 construction workers in the country are migrants, mostly from South Asian countries such as India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. The country's 2,738,000 migrant workers make up 95% of the country's workforce. Fortunately Human Rights Watch called on the UAE, as a member of the International Labor Organization, to implement and respect fundamental workers' rights, including the right to freedom of association and collective bargaining and the right to strike. Human Rights Watch urged the government to implement its existing laws to protect and promote workers' rights.

Dubai Properties
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 

» More on Dubai Properties