Montgomery County Takes you Back in Time

By: Justin Lee

Some people never live in new homes. They prefer an older home brimming with history, and maybe even a ghost or two. Montgomery County emerged as a farming town in 1776, and contains many well preserved historical homes; some dating as far back as the late 1700's. Presently, the area is made up of dozens of small cities, and Montgomery County remains a mix of old and new.

The many communities, such as Cabin John, King Farm and Rockville have classic examples of colonial style homes with wrap around porches and large, tree-lined lots. In Gaithersburg, a city containing a population over 150,000, they have made an effort to preserve their historical roots in an area designated as "Olde Towne". Here, you will find a completely restored quaint little village, complete with original buildings and a nostalgic downtown street design.

If you're the type of person who enjoys traveling back in time to view a home in it's original state, the Montgomery County Historical Society has two homes available for public viewing.

Beall Dawson House: This 1815, elegant federal style home was built for Upton Beall, a well-to-do Montgomery County Resident. It was occupied by his wife, three daughters and various African American slaves who worked there. Built of brick, which was rare during those times; this large, stately residence is situated on a hill overlooking the town. Tour the various rooms, including the slave-quarters, as well as the changing exhibits that illustrate daily life during that period.

Phone: (301) 762-1492

Hours: Tuesday-Sunday, 12-4

Waters House: Originally built in the mid 1790's by Basil Waters, this is the oldest house in Germantown. The farm was named Pleasant Fields, and the home was lived in by three generations of Waters family. It was initially used as a plantation, but later converted to a renowned horse breeding farm. By the late 1800's, the Waters house had evolved from a small brick home set on 200 acres of land, to a 988 acre spread; boasting an elaborate three-story addition. Sadly, Pleasant Fields became one of the many casualties of the Great Depression, and was sold at public auction in 1932.

Phone: (301) 515-2887

Hours: Wednesday-Saturday, 10-4 or by appointment

America Properties
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