Find your Safe Investment in Bank Foreclosures

By: philip smith

From a listing agent's perspective bank foreclosures are not easy to sell. In some hard-hit communities in Midwest cities and in California, the numbers of bank foreclosures grow so high that that the banks themselves make essential repairs, even renting out the properties. As time goes by and no buyer can be found, the costs of minimal security soar, burglaries and squatters disturb neighborhoods. There is mold. Untended swimming pools lie stagnant and stinking, a health hazard to add to those same neighbors' problems. It seems that some bank foreclosures can't be sold at any price.

From the buyer's perspective the bank can seem inflexible, bureaucratic and elephantine. However with the right approach and a little perseverance, working with the bank's listing agent and understanding the local real estate market, buying bank owned property for the right price is a good investment. Find that foreclosed property that is 'safe', the one of the most desirable size, in the right location, so that you can do the essential repairs, either live in it knowing you could put it back on that same cold market if you had to and make a little; or rent it out till prices rise again, and make a lot more.

REO investing has some great pluses for the home buyer or newer investor. The bank owned property is generally listed through a local agent, you can inspect the house and it will be vacant possession. You can work out your price and have time to raise your finance when you make your offer. Unlike at auction you do not need cash to support your bid. The bank will list 'as is' but that doesn't stop you adding a conditional clause. Make sure you inspect the house and get your own appraisal. Inspect gain before you close the deal and push for any adjustment necessary.

Make the lowest offer you think is justified. The agent may believe bank guidelines are a maximum of 15% discount off the adjusted list price. Make your offer for a further discount off that adjusted price if you believe condition warrants; at worst you will get a 'no'. More likely you will get a counter offer. It's rare to get a quick response or to be a quick process. Be confident your offer will be taken seriously; there are always more bank foreclosure homes on offer than there are buyers!

Foreclosures
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 

» More on Foreclosures