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Indonesia » Bali » Tourist Guide » History » History Of Bali
History Of Bali
by: Celestine

The end of Indonesia’s prehistoric age brought about with it the Hindu religion and its repercussive effects. To be exact, Hinduism first came into existence in Indonesia during the period where the Majapahit Kingdom first collapsed to the year 1500 AC. The prehistoric age officially ended as during this time, written historical records have begun to take place and it was the influences from India that brought about this change.

Deciphering ancient inscriptions from the 8th century, it was deduced that prehistoric Bali was between this time to the 14th century which was also the same period that Mahapatih Gajah Mada from the Majapahit Kingdom arrived in Bali. The name Bali dwipa has been around since that time. This was especially evidenced by the Blanjong inscription done by Sri Kesari Warmadewa in 913 AC, with the mention of “Walidwipa”.

It was in the time of King Anak Wungsu where we begin to be able to differentiate the forms of art into two main categories – Royal Arts and Folk Arts. The royal arts were not closed off to villagers. They are sometimes exhibited for all to attend.

Some of the practices of this age were embedded deeply in the worship of ancentral spirits. When Hinduism swept into Bali, the influences of these practices were shown in the architectural constructions of the temples. Believing in the gods in all of nature stayed strong even after the arrival of Hinduism. There is also a theory that in the early ages, people either belonged to the Siwa religion or Buddhism. Because some of the people living in the past had names beginning with Siwa and quite a few of them were priests. Eg: Priest Siwanirmala and Priest Siwaprajna. The counselors of the King during the reign of Udayana reflected this assumption in inscribing notes citing their spiritual beliefs in the Siwa and Buddha direction.