Helpful Guidance on Using Cleaning agent

by : rhusain



There are many cleaning agent available in the market. But we need to know what the are the used and for which stains they are. You will find a very helpful guidance in this article.

There are many cleaning agent available in the market. But we need to know what the are the used and for which stains they are. You will find a very helpful guidance in this article.

SOLVENTS
Cleaning fluids (non-flammable) Carbon tetrachloride * Stoddard solvent
Flammable
Benzene, gasoline, and commercial cleaning fluids so designated
Turpentine
Alcohol * (denatured); dilute with one to two parts of water
for acetate and delicate colors Kerosene
Acetone; do not use on acetate, Dynel or Arnel Amyl acetate (banana oil); can be used on acetate

SOLUTIONS FOR RUG STAINS (see also Rugs and Carpets) Detergent 2 teaspoons of detergent stirred until dissolved in 2 cups of warm water. Apply to stain with medicine dropper and wipe gently with clean cloth, using rotary motion. Sponge with clean warm water, then blot with damp cloth.

Vinegar
1/4 cup of white vinegar in 3/4 cup of lukewarm water. Apply as above, gently patting the area with cloth. Allow solution to remain on stain for 15 minutes, then blot and rinse as above.
?Poisonous: store carefully. Keep bottles tightly stoppered possible. Then saturate the spot with carbon tetrachloride until the gum yields. STICKY FLYPAPER, ADHESIVE TAPE, WAXES, and COD LIVER OIL also respond to cleaning fluids. But treat the cod liver oil stains before the material is washed. For PRINTER'S INK rub in vaseline or lard, then use the fluid. For RUBBER CEMENT use cleaning fluid. If the cement stain is old and hard, soften it with vaseline before using the cleaning fluid, or rub it with a dry cleaning soap. Solvents are also useful in dealing with stains made by SHOE
?DRESSINGS and the tough kindred group made up of TAR, ROAD OIL, AXLE GREASE, PITCH, and ASPHALT.

OTHER SOLVENTS good for paints of various kinds are carbon tetrachloride, benzene (for ordinary spar VARNISH), kerosene, alcohol (for SHELLAC) and acetone. Acetone is especially good for LACQUERS and seldom affects colors. It will remove FINGERNAIL POLISH, MIMEOGRAPH CORRECTION FLUID, and AIRPLANE "GLUE." Acetone can be used on rugs and on all fabrics excepting acetate, Dynel, and Arnel, which it dissolves. For these, first wet the stain with cleaning fluid, then apply a drop of amyl acetate (banana oil), but if the stain was made by a lacquer that contained acetone, the fibers will already be damaged.

WATER. Many stains caused by materials other than grease, even fruit stains can be removed from cloth with plain cool water if they are treated when they occur. Always try cool water first; it is the safest of all solvents. Rugged play clothes, badly stained (as when little Susie and Jerry discover a wild strawberry or blackberry patch) can be easily cleaned if you put them right into the washer with the water set for very hot and run them through without soap or detergent.

STEAM from a boiling tea kettle can rout several stains that many women consider difficult. For instance a fresh IODINE stain can be removed easily from almost any material if you wet it with water and hold it in steam. If the fabric is heat-sensitive (silk, wool, or synthetic) hold it further from the spout where the heat is less intense. IRON RUST stains often yield obligingly to the steam treatment too. Moisten them first with water, then squeeze lemon juice directly onto the stain and hold it in the steam for several minutes. Rinse the stain with water and if the stain has not disappeared completely repeat the treatment as many times as necessary. Another way is to apply lemon juice and salt and place the material in the sun. WATER SPOTS are caused by displacement of sizing used in finishing cloth and these too can be steamed. Since crisp silks and rayons are the materials most likely to be spotted by water, and both are sensitive to heat, hold them well away from the spout. Shake the material about in the steam and press it after it has been thoroughly dampened. Use steam to freshen VELVETS too.

Bleach can be used for cotton, linen and synthetics. Solvents are fluids cleaning agents which are non-flammable. Acetone can be used on rugs and on all fabrics. Many stains can be removed from cloth with plain cool water, this is the basic solvent when the stains occur. STEAM from a boiling tea kettle can rout several stains that we consider difficult.