Mercedes Strut Mount Holds Car Steady

by : Dwyane Thomas



Since a car's drive train like that of a Mercedes-Benz only has the wheels to prop it up on the ground, it relies on a network of steel braces and sway bars called the strut assembly to support the weight of the car. During cruise speed, the Mercedes-Benz strut assembly serves as catch framework where bounce from bumps is rerouted. Meanwhile, as the car hugs curves, bounce together with chassis flex and longitudinal compression get transmitted into the strut assembly. Every time bounce and chassis flex are redirected in the Mercedes-Benz struts, the cabin is spared from an otherwise uncomfortable ride.

In the case of chassis flex and longitudinal compression, a Mercedes-Benz is theoretically liable to roll off when cornering. But, because of its strut assembly design, chassis flex and compression is transmitted away from the cabin and into the STRUTS, maintaining the car's bearing on corners. The same is done to the weight of the vehicle and the bounce from bumps. This function of the strut assembly gives the description "passive" shock absorbers to the strut assembly. Compared to shock absorbers, however, the stress on the chassis produced by both drive applications are not absorbed but are rather transmitted down to the strut mounting points.

Mercedes-Benz struts are usually installed across the chassis and at the heart of the drive train, where it is on a high ground to function as chassis frame and support the car. These struts often sport rugged designs and can be used to improve on the upper suspension arms of the Mercedes-Benz. Due to the strain that strut assembly must absorb away from the chassis, they are held firmly by similarly heavy-duty strut mounts. The s serve as pivot points for the strut assembly. For improved absorption of longitudinal compression, struts are lubricated at either ends.

In most cases, the front end of the Mercedes-Benz is equipped with a MacPherson type of struts. This assembly has rubber strut mounts with strut bearings and bushings in the center to provide mobility for steering. A MacPherson strut is also used on the rear end of the drive train if the Mercedes-Benz is capable of 4-wheel drive. Normally, a traditional strut assembly composed of strut tower braces and sway bars affixed to a chrome strut mount shaft is used on the read end of the drive train.

As the struts transmit force, strut mounts keep the assembly still. And as the strut assembly resists the chassis flex in the drive train and supports the Mercedes-Benz's sideways load, strut mounts can loose grip of a strut quickly. If a metallic under-chassis noise can be heard every time the Mercedes-Benz turns, it is a sign that the strut assembly has become loose on the strut mounts. Hard steering is another indication that the strut assembly may not be in a good condition to spare the chassis from compression. With a strut's heavy load and the regular pounding that it receives, it is critical that loose strut mounts are immediately addressed to ensure safe driving.