How the Herpes Virus Gets Transmitted?

By: Andy Smith

When we speak about transmission, we are finding out about how the virus enters the body. Both HSAV 1 and HSV2 can enter the body through tiny cuts in the skin (even microscopic) and through the mucous membrane. Our inside of mouth, inner genitals, anus, are all covered with mucous membrane. If you get in contact with saliva of an infected person or the lesion or skin, which is shedding virus, your chances of getting herpes are high. Let us discuss this further.

Genital herpes is transmitted by sexual contact. If a partner is infected he/she can transmit the genital herpes virus to the partner. Some facts are given below-

The risks of transmission are very high when the infected person is having active outbreak of herpes.

If a partner has cold sores and performs oral sex on the other partner, transmission will take place.

Both HSV1 and HSV2 can cause genital herpes. HSV1 infection is commonly found in the mouth. Kissing will therefore transmit herpes virus causing oral herpes in the other partner.

The transmission can take place even if active outbreak is not seen. Many people shed the virus without showing any outbreak this is called asymptomatic shedding. So if you are involving in sexual activity with someone with no outbreak signs, you may still get herpes if the other person sheds the virus.

The possibility of transmission is high during the prodrome phase. Genital herpes has a phase called the prodrome phase. This phase occurs before the outbreak and indicates that an outbreak will occur soon. During this phase, one gets sensations such as tingling, itching or some pain in the genital area. Active outbreak takes place in a day or two or more after that. Beware of this phase in your partner.

This article is only for informative purposes. This article is not intended to be a medical advise and it is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Please consult your doctor for your medical concerns. Please follow any tip given in this article only after consulting your doctor. The author is not liable for any outcome or damage resulting from information obtained from this article.

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