Internet Flood in 2010

By: Jesse Miller

One of the warnings that appeared over the Internet recently draws our attention to a rather strange phenomenon. Apparently there is the possibility that in 2010 we will have very low surfing speeds.

Either pessimistic or simply good observers of the evolution of the Internet, Nemertes researchers announced that it is quite possible for people to experiment a slow speed degradation, just like during the long gone dial-up period.

The research performed by Nemertes compares, for the first time, the exponential growth caused by traffic with expansion plans.

The thing is that estimated expansion plans of companies that provide internet to users do not quite fall into the graphics obtained when estimating the future traffic we are to expect in 2010. For example, in North America, in order to keep up with the traffic growth, the expansion would cost companies over 55 billion dollars, more than 70% than they planned.

Most Internet cable operators must also invest considerable amounts. The big majority of them already have the resources to send data toward users, but they are not good when dealing with the reverse process. Unfortunately today more and more users send data toward providers, as they are uploading more often videos, photos or music.

The best warning that can be sent out to providers is to send them a research based on a popular upload site such as YouTube. Two years ago few people new about it, and today YouTube is generating 27 gigabytes of traffic a month.

In short, if they don't make sound and on time investments, we will be forced to re-live in just a few years Internet experiences that will take us back to old times when uploading was an almost impossible task, when surfing took ages and when if you wanted to download a movie you knew it took almost a day to complete.

One of the warnings that appeared over the Internet recently draws our attention to a rather strange phenomenon. Apparently there is the possibility that in 2010 we will have very low surfing speeds. Either pessimistic or simply good observers of the evolution of the Internet, Nemertes researchers announced that it is quite possible for people to experiment a slow speed degradation, just like during the long gone dial-up period.

The research performed by Nemertes compares, for the first time, the exponential growth caused by traffic with expansion plans. The thing is that estimated expansion plans of companies that provide internet to users do not quite fall into the graphics obtained when estimating the future traffic we are to expect in 2010. For example, in North America, in order to keep up with the traffic growth, the expansion would cost companies over 55 billion dollars, more than 70% than they planned.

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Most Internet cable operators must also invest considerable amounts. The big majority of them already have the resources to send data toward users, but they are not good when dealing with the reverse process. Unfortunately today more and more users send data toward providers, as they are uploading more often videos, photos or music.

The best warning that can be sent out to providers is to send them a research based on a popular upload site such as YouTube. Two years ago few people new about it, and today YouTube is generating 27 gigabytes of traffic a month.

In short, if they don't make sound and on time investments, we will be forced to re-live in just a few years Internet experiences that will take us back to old times when uploading was an almost impossible task, when surfing took ages and when if you wanted to download a movie you knew it took almost a day to complete.

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