Successful Potty Training

By: Adwina Jackson

When you already introduce and a potty training to your children and they seem to be cooperative with the method you are applying, I believe it is important to keep it flowing. The aim is to reach a successful training.

I hope you remain optimistic as we go through the ten things I will outline below. I’m not throwing all of this at you to stress you out! Don’t look at all of this as too much information. You’ll pick all the tips up in due time.

Let’s take a look at the ten points to keep moving ahead. Here they are.

1. Let Your Toddler Observe

It is important for you to let your toddler observe what you’re doing in the bathroom. I believe we should designate the bathroom a “no privacy zone" during potty training. In other words, mommy and daddy get “no privacy" at all!

Honestly, are you experiencing that yet? It’s an invasion, but it only lasts a short period of time! Plus, your child is so young that he won't remember anything that he sees

2. Let Your Toddler Change His Mind

First he’s interested in seeing what is happening in the bathroom, and then he’s not. Don’t be surprised if your child changes his mind really fast. Pediatricians say this happens a lot. Plus, the toilet can seem awfully unusual to a toddler. Or who knows, maybe it’s just plain ole boring to him. So, don’t be surprised if he shows and interest, then not!

3. Develop a Routine

You have heard it said that children are creatures of habit. You probably already have a morning, noon and bed time routine. Well, you need one for potty time as well. An example of a routine includes singing a song on the way to the potty or washing hands afterward. Children like to know what to expect and a routine helps them figure it out.

4. Express Frustration

It’s okay for your child to get a little frustrated with this potty mess. A child that is going through the terrible two is not going to want to stop what he is doing just to sit on a chair with a hole in it! You have to understand his position. Don't be surprised if your child gets a little flustered from time to time.

5. Don’t Force the Issue

Don’t make your toddler sit on the potty for an extended period of time. Encourage your child to use the potty by himself. This will not get you there. At least not fast.

6. Accidents Happen

Hey, accidents happen to the best of us. Why should your toddler be any different? Visualize this picture. Your child tries to make it to the pot and messes the mark so to speak. This is one of the common roadblocks you will run into. You can acknowledge that the accident occurred however not make a big deal out of it. You can let your child help you clean up the mess. He’ll probably make an even bigger mess but that’s okay.

7. Never Punish

Punishment is never a good thing to do. You may feel like your child should sit there until something, anything comes out. However, it is important not to force your child to sit on the potty for long periods of time.

8. Use Potty Anytime

We’ve already established that it’s his potty. We know that it’s his body he’s working with. Plus, it’s his poop. Give your toddler a little freedom to sit down and get back up whenever he wants. You can also take the potty outside during playtime. This will make it accessible during emergencies. Don’t be afraid if he becomes potty obsessive. At least, just not yet!

9. Never Compare Children

Kids are like apples and oranges, but sweeter. You don’t want to compare children because they are all so different. Accept your child for the unique person he is.

You’ll want to avoid comparing your child to a sibling. You may feel like saying, “your sister was nothing like this." But, you can’t! You would be breaking the parents oath if. The parents oath is to bathe clothe, and nourish your child while never comparing them to a sibling. Okay, I just made that one up. But, you get the point.

10. Train Sexes the Same, but…

We all know that there are anatomical differences between boys and girls. However, in the beginning you should train them the same way. You should train boys sitting down like girls. Once you get your boy up and running so to speak then you can add the standing part to the equation.

Boys are typically harder to train than girls. On an average, their bodies also mature at a slower rate. This makes them more prone to bed wetting. On the other hand as you train girls you’ll want to make a note that they require special attention as well. You’ll want to show them to wipe from front to back so the urethra is not exposed to feces. Exposure could lead to a urinary tract infection.

Now let’s look at the five steps you should do to potty safety. Here they are:
Five Steps to Potty Safety

1. Don’t leave your child unattended

I think this goes without saying, plus there are state and local laws covering this! Okay, I’m just kidding. But, you don’t want to leave your child unattended because you don’t want him to get hurt. It’s as simple as that. Keep an eye on your child to prevent accidents before they occur.

2. Make sure the step stool is secure.

You wouldn’t want to step on a shaky ladder, now would you? So don’t expect your child to step on a shaky stool. It’s best to try to avoid accidents before they can happen. Just imagine if your child slipped and fell off of the step stool. Ouch, or worst!

3. Don’t leave appliances plugged in. Your child may pull them in the toilet.

Let’s see if you don’t follow this safety rule, then you run the risk of electrocution and death or electrocution and hospitalization. All electrical equipment should be kept out of a child’s way, period. It doesn’t matter if it’s in the bathroom or dining room.

4. Make sure the training cushion is secure on the toilet.

Okay, if the step stool needs to be secure and the electrical appliances need to be put up, and then is this safety step far fetched? Please make sure the training cushion is always locked down and secure. Why, your child could fall into the toilet!

5. Make sure all of your potty tools are child safety approved.

There’s a federally funded agency that you’ve more than likely heard of. It’s called the Consumer Product Safety Commission. They put out reports almost daily about unsafe products that we buy. I learned to look for their warning signs in stores. You can usually find the warnings in the customer service areas. You can also find them on the web at http://www.consumer.gov/productsafety.htm

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