Lyrical Copywriting

By: Rayedwards
This article will briefly examine the field of lyrical copywriting.

Copywriting has the same goal no matter the field you're in: to compel a certain audience to buy a particular product. Writing song lyrics isn't any different. In this arena you must know your audience, what moves them and agrees with their thoughts and experiences, and then make a product that appeals to them. Many people write songs that fail to agree with their audience and never make it onto the radio. A good songwriter knows that their audience wants and can give it to them.

Your song will have an overall message, but it must also have an instant recognition mechanism. Beyonce's new song, "Irreplaceable" illustrates this well. Here she sings "To the left, to the left" in a unique manner that immediately identifies the song to the audience. This helps build awareness of your particular singer and song.

Writing song lyrics is not just about sales and money either. Few have the ability to move people with words and melodies. It is important to note that is it difficult to remember all the words to a song, and thus you should put your main point and hook in the chorus. This helps the audience know your message quickly.

Copywriting has the main goal of persuasion. Whether it is in a newspaper, a magazine or a song, you are attempting to persuade your audience into believing a message or buying a product. Song verse copywriting attempts to persuade the audience through music and poetry. With some luck the audience will like the song and purchase the album.

Hopefully this article helped illustrate the goals of Copywriting song lyrics. Your chief goal as a lyrical copywriter is to raise the awareness of a particular singer by successfully sending a message your audience. Note that it is difficult to remember all the lyrics in a song, so make a short and catchy message in the chorus. Lyrical copywriting has multiple goals and can be very rewarding.
Top Searches on
Copywriting
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 
 • 

» More on Copywriting